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American Southwest (#01): Creede, Colorado

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Uploaded on Jul 31, 2011

Why the Southwest? This region is not a single destination but a series of destinations ... from the desert to the mountains. Scenic back roads offering the allure of serenity and tranquility and slower paced travel ... small towns that invite you to linger a while ... mountain vistas that bask in the changing colors of the autumn season of golden aspens and cottonwoods ... snow capped peaks that foretell the oncoming harsh season ... canyons of all manner that lift your spirits at the first light of day when the sunrises wash the cliffs in orange to the deep shadows of sunsets when the same cliffs are crimson and blood-red.

Creede: Creede was probably the wildest town in all of Colorado during its heyday of three short years. Creede was founded in 1890 after Nicholas Creede struck it rich in 1889 with silver at the Holy Moses Mine in North Willow Creek. In just one short year, Creede became a hopping boom town. The population increased by 300 people daily in 1890 and grew to more than 10,000 people before the town's sudden demise in 1893 due to plummeting silver prices. Compare that with a population of approximately 590 for all of Mineral County today, and you'll get a feel for Creede's popularity and importance when mining was king.

Creede is known for its resiliency. It suffered through major floods in 1892, 1903, 1911, 1917, and 1942. One flood killed more than 1,000 people in the suburb of North Creede. (That is more people than than live here today.) The town was rebuilt after four devastating fires; the first was the same year as the first flood, 1892. Other large fires occurred in 1895, 1902 and 1936.

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