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Rattansi & Ridley #19 4of4

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Uploaded on Mar 7, 2010

3of4 - #19 - Afshin Rattansi and Yvonne Ridley talk to:
Tino Sehgal in New York talks about his latest work showing at the Guggenheim Museum of Art about the themes of progress and materialism.
Tino Sehgal (born 1976) is a British-German artist based in Berlin. His works, which he calls "constructed situations",[1] involve one or more people carrying out instructions conceived by the artist.
His father, a member of the Sehgal family, "had to flee from what is today Pakistan when he was a child, and he became a manager at IBM"[2]; his mother was "a German native and homemaker."[3] Sehgal was born in London but grew up mostly in Düsseldorf and Paris; he studied political economy and dance in Berlin and Essen and began to work as an artist in 2000.
He has exhibited at a number of important venues including the Institute of Contemporary Arts, the Tate gallery, Manifesta 4 and the 2005 Venice Biennale. In 2006 he was shortlisted for the Hugo Boss Prize.[4] In 2008 the Nicola Trussardi Foundation has presented Tino Sehgals first major exhibition in Italy in the setting of Villa Reale, one of the most spectacular historic buildings in Milan.
On the sale of his work, the artist stipulates that there is no written set of instructions, no written receipt, no catalogue and no pictures.[1] This means that his work is not documented in any way. (This mandate, however, has proven to be largely symbolic, and unenforceable.)[5]
[edit]Works

For This is New a museum attendant says out headlines from the day's paper to visitors. In This Success/This Failure young children attempt to play without using objects and sometimes draw visitors into their games.[1] Instead of allowing some things to rise up to your face, dancing bruce and dan and other things (2000) - is a live re-enactment of movements from dance-influenced video-works by Dan Graham and Bruce Nauman. For This is Good (2001) a museum worker repeats the title while waving their arms and hopping from one leg to the other.[6] In This is Propaganda (2002) a museum guard sings a song with the lyrics "This is propaganda/you know/you know" when a visitor enters the room. For This objective of that object (2004) the visitor becomes surrounded by five people who remain with their backs to the visitors . The five chant, "'The objective of this work is to become the object of a discussion," and if the visitor does not respond they slowly sink to the ground. If the visitor says something they begin a discussion.[7]
His work is held in the collection of the Tate.[8]

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