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Super Solar Storm - music: Andromeda by Doc

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Uploaded on Apr 9, 2011

music: Andromeda by Doc & Lena Selyanina
visual credits: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center
ESA/Hubble (M. Kornmesser & L. L. Christensen)
http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/sun...
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/ste...
music: Andromeda by Doc & Lena Selyanina album: Cosmic Lullabies
Ambient, Electronic, Easylistening, Experimental
Space, Meditative http://www.jamendo.com/en/album/18115
lisence http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b...
more about Doc music: http://www.musictrade.info
http://www.spacetelescope.org/videos/...
NASA has revised their prediction for solar maximum to now occur around mid-May of 2013. sources:
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/sun...

Solar SuperStorm 1859 -- It could happen again
http://modernsurvivalblog.com/solar-c...

Solar physicist David Hathaway of the National Space Science & Technology Center (NSSTC) explains: "First, remember what sunspots are--tangled knots of magnetism generated by the sun's inner dynamo. A typical sunspot exists for just a few weeks. Then it decays, leaving behind a 'corpse' of weak magnetic fields."
Enter the conveyor belt.
"The top of the conveyor belt skims the surface of the sun, sweeping up the magnetic fields of old, dead sunspots. The 'corpses' are dragged down at the poles to a depth of 200,000 km where the sun's magnetic dynamo can amplify them. Once the corpses (magnetic knots) are reincarnated (amplified), they become buoyant and float back to the surface." Presto—new sunspots!
Right: The sun's "great conveyor belt."
All this happens with massive slowness. "It takes about 40 years for the belt to complete one loop," says Hathaway. The speed varies "anywhere from a 50-year pace (slow) to a 30-year pace (fast)."
When the belt is turning "fast," it means that lots of magnetic fields are being swept up, and that a future sunspot cycle is going to be intense. This is a basis for forecasting: "The belt was turning fast in 1986-1996," says Hathaway. "Old magnetic fields swept up then should re-appear as big sunspots in 2010-2011."
Like most experts in the field, Hathaway has confidence in the conveyor belt model and agrees with Dikpati that the next solar maximum should be a doozy. But he disagrees with one point. Dikpati's forecast puts Solar Max at 2012. Hathaway believes it will arrive sooner, in 2010 or 2011.
"History shows that big sunspot cycles 'ramp up' faster than small ones," he says. "I expect to see the first sunspots of the next cycle appear in late 2006 or 2007—and Solar Max to be underway by 2010 or 2011."
Who's right? Time will tell. Either way, a storm is coming...
A massive eruption of the sun would save waves of radiation and charged particles to Earth, damaging the satellite systems used for synchronising computers, airline navigation and phone.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4_TzIU...

Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use."

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