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WRC 2011 : FIA World Rally Championship 2 Gameplay

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Uploaded on Nov 10, 2011

WRC 2 : FIA World Rally Championship 2011 Gameplay by http://www.watchgameplay.com

WRC 2 FIA World Rally Championship (also known as WRC 2, WRC 2 FIA World Rally Championship 2, 2011 FIA World Rally Championship) is the official racing video game of the 2011 FIA World Rally Championship. It is developed by Milestone S.r.l. and features improved details, visuals and new modes to be the most realistic rally simulation. WRC 2 was released in Europe on October 14, 2011 and February 16, 2012 in Japan, and has been released on multiple platforms, PlayStation 3, Microsoft Windows and Xbox 360. The game features six-stage championships, special timed challenge stages, and 16-player online modes. There is a revamped Career mode, which encourages more team management and has new recruitment features. The single-player mode features many options like Single Stage Mode, Single Rally Mode, Championship Mode, Time Attack Mode, Career Mode and WRC Rally School. This is where the player can compete with AI's or with his own ghosts to improve driving skills. Vehicles sustain damage according to your driving on tracks and behaves accordingly. There are total 90 stages in 15 locations to compete upon in single player mode. The multiplayer option is available for 16 player online gaming. Race types available are Single Stage, Championship, Single Rally, and Super Special Stage. Rallying was again slow to get under way after a major war, but the 1950s were the Golden Age of the long-distance road rally. In Europe, the Monte Carlo Rally, the French and Austrian Alpines, and the Liège were joined by a host of new events that quickly established themselves as classics: the Lisbon Rally (Portugal, 1947), the Tulip Rally (the Netherlands, 1949), the Rally to the Midnight Sun (Sweden, 1951, now the Swedish Rally) the Rally of the 1000 Lakes (Finland, 1951 - now the Rally Finland), and the Acropolis Rally (Greece, 1956).The RAC Rally gained International status on its return in 1951, but for 10 years its emphasis on map-reading navigation and short manoevrability tests made it unpopular with foreign crews. The FIA created in 1953 a European Rally Championship (at first called the "Touring Championship") of eleven events, won by Helmut Polensky of Germany. This was the premier international championship until 1973, when the Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile (FIA) created the World Rally Championship for Manufacturers, won in the first year by Alpine-Renault. Not until 1979 was there a World Rally Championship for Drivers, won that year by Björn Waldegård. In 1980, a German car maker, Audi, at that time not noted for their interest in rallying, introduced a rather large and heavy coupé version of their family saloon, installed a turbocharged 2.1 litre five-cylinder engine, and fitted it with four-wheel drive. Thus the Audi Quattro was born. International regulations had prohibited four-wheel drive; but FISA accepted that this was a genuine production car, and changed the rules. The Quattro quickly became the car to beat on snow, ice or gravel; and in 1983 took Hannu Mikkola to the World Rally Championship title. Other manufacturers had no production four-wheel drive car on which to base their response, so FISA was persuaded to change the rules, and open the Championship to cars in Group B. This allowed cars to be much further removed from production models, and so was created a generation of rallying supercars, of which the most radical and impressive were the Peugeot 205 T16, Renault 5 Turbo and the Lancia Delta S4, with flimsy fibreglass bodies roughly the shape of the standard car tacked on to lightweight spaceframe chassis, four-wheel drive, and power outputs reportedly as high as 600 hp (450 kW). Further Group B cars were developed by Ford (the RS200), British Leyland (the Metro 6R4) and many others, but these were less successful.

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