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Amazing Game : Bobby Fischer vs Mikhail Tal - 1959 - Sicilian Defence - Najdorf Variation (B90)

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Uploaded on Jul 23, 2007

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Fischer vs Tal 1959

[Event "Yugoslavia ct Rd: 21"]
[Site "Yugoslavia ct Rd: 21"]
[Date "1959.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "0-1"]
[White "Robert James Fischer"]
[Black "Mikhail Tal"]
[ECO "B90"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "66"]

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6. Bc4 e6
7. Bb3 Be7 8. f4 O-O 9. Qf3 Qc7 10. O-O b5 11. f5 b4 12. Na4
e5 13. Ne2 Bb7 14. Ng3 Nbd7 15. Be3 Bc6 16. Bf2 Qb7 17. Rfe1
d5 18. exd5 Nxd5 19. Ne4 Nf4 20. c4 g6 21. fxg6 f5 22. g7 Kxg7
23. Qg3+ Kh8 24. Nec5 Nxc5 25. Bxc5 Bxc5+ 26. Nxc5 Qc7 27. Qe3
Rae8 28. Re2 Nxe2+ 29. Qxe2 Bxg2 30. Nxa6 Qa7+ 31. Kxg2 Rg8+
32. Kh3 Qg7 33. Bd1 Re6 0-1 Mikhail Tal (Latvian: Mihails Tāls; Russian: Михаил Нехемьевич Таль, Michail Nechem'evič Tal, pronounced [mʲixʌˈiɫ nʲɪˈxɛmʲɪvʲit͡ɕ ˈtal]; sometimes transliterated Mihails Tals or Mihail Tal; November 9, 1936 -- June 28, 1992)[1] was a Soviet-Latvian chess Grandmaster and the eighth World Chess Champion (from 1960 to 1961).
Widely regarded as a creative genius and the best attacking player of all time, he played in a daring, combinational style.[2][3] His play was known above all for improvisation and unpredictability. Every game, he once said, was as inimitable and invaluable as a poem.[4] He was often called "Misha", a diminutive for Mikhail, and "The magician from Riga". Both The Mammoth Book of the World's Greatest Chess Games (Burgess, Nunn & Emms 2004) and Modern Chess Brilliancies (Evans 1970) include more games by Tal than any other player. Tal was also a highly regarded chess writer. He also holds the records for both the first and second longest unbeaten streaks in competitive chess history.[5]
The Mikhail Tal Memorial is held in Moscow annually since 2006 to honour Tal's memory. - Robert James "Bobby" Fischer (March 9, 1943 -- January 17, 2008) was an American chess grandmaster and the eleventh World Chess Champion. He is considered by many to be the greatest chess player who ever lived.
A chess prodigy, at age 13 Fischer won a "brilliancy" that became known as The Game of the Century. Starting at age 14, he played in eight United States Championships, winning each by at least a point. At age 15½, he became both the youngest grandmaster and the youngest candidate for the World Championship up to that time. He won the 1963--64 U.S. Championship with 11/11, the only perfect score in the history of the tournament. His book My 60 Memorable Games, published in 1969, remains a revered part of chess literature for advanced players.
In the early 1970s he became one of the most dominant players in history—winning the 1970 Interzonal by a record 3½-point margin and winning 20 consecutive games, including two unprecedented 6--0 sweeps in the Candidates Matches. He became the first official World Chess Federation (FIDE) number-one rated chess player in July 1971, and spent 54 total months at number one. In 1972, he captured the World Championship from Boris Spassky of the USSR in a match widely publicized as a Cold War confrontation. The match, held in Reykjavík, Iceland, attracted more worldwide interest than any chess match before or since.
In 1975, Fischer declined to defend his title when he could not reach agreement with FIDE over the conditions for the match. He became more reclusive and did not play competitive chess again until 1992, when he won an unofficial rematch against Spassky. The competition was held in Yugoslavia, which was then under a United Nations embargo.[1][2][3] This led to a conflict with the U.S. government, which was also seeking income tax from Fischer on his match winnings. Fischer never returned to his native country. After ending his competitive career, he proposed a new variant of chess and a modified chess timing system. His idea of adding a time increment after each move is now standard, and his variant Chess960 is gaining in popularity.[4]
In his later years, Fischer lived in Hungary, Germany, the Philippines, Japan, and Iceland. During this time he made increasingly anti-American and anti-semitic statements. After his U.S. passport was revoked over the Yugoslavia sanctions issue, he was detained by Japanese authorities for nine months in 2004 and 2005 under threat of deportation. In March 2005, Iceland granted him full citizenship.[5] The Japanese authorities then released Fischer to Iceland, where he lived until his death in 2008.[6] ►Subscribe for my regular chess videos: http://goo.gl/zpktUK

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