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17. Renal Physiology (cont.)

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Uploaded on Nov 18, 2008

Frontiers of Biomedical Engineering (BENG 100)

Professor Saltzman continues his description of nephron anatomy, and the specific role of each part of the nephron in establishing concentration gradients to help in secretion and reabsorption of water, ions, nutrients and wastes. A number of molecular transport processes that produces urine from the initial ultra-filtrate, such as passive diffusion by concentration difference, osmosis, and active transport with sodium-potassium ATPase, are listed. Next, Professor Saltzman describes a method to measure glomerular filtration rate (GFR) using tracer molecule, inulin. He then talks about regulation of sodium, an important ion for cell signaling in the body, as an example to demonstrate the different ways in which nephrons maintain homeostasis.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction
03:06 - Chapter 2. The Role of the Nephron in Ion Balance
16:54 - Chapter 3. The Glomerular Filtration Rate
26:21 - Chapter 4. Selective Reabsorption
39:51 - Chapter 5. Water Balance and Conclusion

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

This course was recorded in Spring 2008.

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