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Phasing out incandescent light bulbs

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Published on Jan 3, 2014

CINCINNATI (Angenette Levy) -- As of January 1, companies will no longer make the popular 40 watt and 60 watt incandescent light bulbs. It's part of a 2007 energy efficiency law signed by President W. Bush. The 75 and 100 watt light bulbs have already been phased out. The law requires manufacturers to make light bulbs that are more energy efficient. That's led to the production of compact fluorescents, LED's and halogen light bulbs. I think it's a good thing. I know it's more expensive and I'm glad they came out with the newer LED's that are more the shape of the incandescent because I hated those curly ones, said Terri Alekzander, who was shopping at the Target store in Newport Wednesday night. The traditional incandescent light bulbs may soon be collector's items. Experts say the newer LED, halogen and CFL bulbs produce the same amount of light but use less energy and last longer than their predecessors. The newer bulbs cost more up front but experts say they'll save more in the long run. The old fashioned incandescent bulb actually wastes 90% of the energy it uses. Instead of going to light, it goes to waste heat and that means there's a lot more power plant pollution and it also means that we pay more on our utility bills, said Kit Kennedy of the Natural Resources Defense Council. But not all shoppers are buying it. Kelli Helton said she's hoarding the old incandescent light bulbs. She has 60 in her home. We bought the expensive ones, replaced them all because they say, oh they last for years. No, they didn't last for the same amount of time. A few months and they were burned out, Helton said. The incandescent light bulbs will still be sold at stores as long as supplies last. Others countries including Australia, Venezuela and Switzerland have banned incandescent bulbs. Canada will stop producing them this year as well.

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