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Amphora Art Nouveau Pottery

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Uploaded on Apr 5, 2011

This video is inhabited by some of the fantastical creatures and captivating women that inspired Dr. Byron Vreeland, the eminent Amphora scholar and collector, to title his book "Monsters & Maidens: Amphora Pottery of the Art Nouveau Era." Yet these monsters and maidens only provide a glimpse into the expansive imagination and technical ability of Amphora, the Bohemian ceramics manufactory also known as Riessner, Stellmacher & Kessel (RStK). Enthralling videos could be made of Amphora's "Klimt" series of vases that evoke, or quite possibly foreshadow, design idioms employed by Gustav Klimt, and of the "EDDA" series of vases with glaze dripping from the top, forming handles that resemble candle wax or icicles. Many collectors prize Amphora's sculpted figures, such as the swirling twenty inch statue of modern dance pioneer Loie Fuller, an American that swept Paris off its feet at the turn of the 20th century.

See more Amphora at www.facebook.com/Amphora.Pottery

The astounding array of forms, decors, and glazes produced by Amphora goes on and on, as illustrated in Dr. Vreeland's book and "Ceramics from the House of Amphora" by Richard L. Scott. Like being in an ice cream shop, it's nearly impossible to not find a flavor that you love. And Amphora received lots of love in its day beginning with the "Highest Award" at the World's Columbian Exposition, Chicago, 1893. This was followed by a stream of awards, including the Gold Medal at the Universal Exposition, Paris, 1900, and Grand Prizes at the St. Louis World's Fair, 1904 and the Universal Exposition, Brussels, 1910.

Those who live and breathe antiques won't have any trouble imagining Amphora or other antique pottery gracing their homes. However, for those whose interior decorating revolves around eco-friendly values a few thoughts might be of interest. First, when you buy an antique the environmental footprint is much, much smaller than a new item. Secondly, the Art Nouveau movement was in part a reaction to the Industrial Revolution. It was a return to nature and the values of craftsmanship. As you see in this video Amphora was immersed in nature. A seahorse, wasps, plum tree, abstract roses, thistles, clover, and lavender forest make appearances. Many more nature inspired forms and decors are in the Amphora line up. Paul Dachsel, who was one of the premier ceramic designers for Amphora, eventually left to start his own pottery. He crafted many vases that would enhance an Arts and Crafts home and made many, as did Amphora, that are so ahead of their time they would resonate with a contemporary decor.


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