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Occupy Homes MN Marches on the Home of US Bank CEO Richard Davis

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Published on Mar 15, 2012

Minneapolis, MN - Occupy Homes MN supporters paid a visit to the $2.2 million home of US Bank CEO Richard Davis along with several homeowners facing foreclosure as part of the Occupy Homes national week of action on the banks. Participants mic checked their demand that US Bank negotiate with homeowner Monique White, Vietnam veteran John Vinje and others facing foreclosure and eviction at the hands of US Bank.

Bobby Hull, a homeowner who won his home after neighbors and supporters waged a public pressure campaign, delivered a giant invitation to Richard Davis to attend a community forum on foreclosure at Zion Baptist Church in North Minneapolis on April 7th at 12pm to meet with US Bank customers in foreclosure to discuss how he can help keep them in their homes and work with our communities to solve the housing crisis.

While doorknocking the neighborhood, the organizers met with Davis' neighbor whose daughter had lost her home to foreclosure. The neighbor put up two highly visible Occupy Homes MN signs up in front of her house just across the street from Davis' home.

"We want to respectfully ask Mr. Davis and US Bank to work with customers like me to keep us in our homes. We bailed them out with our tax dollars when they were in trouble at the start of the housing crisis they created, now we need them to work with us to help stabilize our communities, instead of tearing them apart," said Monique White.

Since October, protesters have been bringing attention to Minneapolis-headquartered US Bank for their ongoing role in the foreclosure crisis. While speaking at an event hosted by the Minnesota Chamber of Commerce, Davis, whose 2011 total compensation topped $18 million, allegedly told homeowners fighting foreclosure and their supporters rallying outside the event to "get over it.'

"These executives have been making life hell for the average American, while they're making record profits and have a comfy home to sleep in. It's up to us to stand together and pressure the banks to make things right with the American people. If they can negotiate a solution with me, there's no reason they can't do the same for millions of other homeowners fighting to keep a roof over their family's heads," said Bobby Hull, a veteran and homeowner who won back his home through a nationwide public pressure campaign after US Bank purchased it at the sheriff's sale. He is now fighting to help other homeowners get the same deal he did to keep them in their homes.

"Do you know how much US Bank CEO Richard Davis made last year? Over 18 million dollars. And now he wants my house without so much as a good faith negotiation? Well guess what... he can't have it!" said John Vinje, US Bank customer fighting foreclosure and Vietnam veteran.

For someone making $18 million dollars a year as the CEO of a company making record profits to be throwing families out of their homes is beyond comprehension. All we're asking for is simply that US Bank try to keep families in their homes rather than throw them out."

We eagerly await Richard Davis' response to our invitation to join us April 7th for the community forum.

Support honest coverage of the Occupy Movement in Minnesota:
http://www.OccupyMNTV.org

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