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Simulation of a dissolving crystal

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Published on Dec 2, 2013

The animation is the result of a so called Monte Carlo simulation and shows a simplified, idealized crystal (Kossel-Stranski crystal). Each atom in the crystal is colour-coded according to the number of bonds which attach it to the surface. The less bonds the higher the probability that the atom can detach from its current position, and ultimately be dissolve in the surrounding fluid. As bonds with nearest neighbours are broken during the simulation, the colour (bonding status) of each atom changes. Atoms with five bonds are shown in red-brown, atoms with four bonds in tan, atoms with three bonds in yellow, and atoms with two bonds in red. Single-bonded atoms (so-called adatoms) are in pink, but are very rarely observed in this particular simulation.




From the publication: Luttge, Arvidson, and Fischer 2013, A Stochastic Treatment of Crystal Dissolution Kinetics, Elements 9:183-188

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