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Sex, Drugs, the Internet and Juries (10 March 2011)

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Uploaded on Mar 14, 2011

Lunch Hour Lecture: Sex, Drugs, the Internet and Juries

Professor Cheryl Thomas (UCL Laws)

Is it true that juries rarely convict defendants in rape cases and are more likely to convict ethnic minority defendants than White defendants? And why can't jurors resist going home at night and googling the defendant or tweeting about the case -- against the express instructions of the judge. This lecture reveals the truth behind a number of widely held beliefs about juries in this country and examines why the internet may now be the biggest threat to our jury system.

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