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Obama Issues DREAM Act by executive order | What is the DREAM Act? | with Lili Gil

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Uploaded on Jun 22, 2011

Pre-election PR or common sense? Obama issues DREAM Act by executive order
By Lili Gil, Host Moments 2CultuRise and Business Expert, XL
June 22, 2011th—On Friday, the Obama administration issued a memo announcing that federal immigration officials do not have to deport illegal aliens if they are enrolled in any type of education program, if their family members have volunteered for U.S. military service, or even if they are pregnant or nursing.
Whether President Obama was inspired by the hospitality of Boricuas in Puerto Rico, or whether he is proactively playing to win big with the Latino 2012 electoral power; he has taken action. The memo is real and stirring much conversation in social media, while being quietly missed by mainstream media. Many bloggers have already expressed their opposing views on the matter, and students are somewhat excited and confused about the implication of this memo. However, one thing is true, the U.S. Latino population is no longer a marginalized group but a community that moves agendas, intentions and even in this case, it has been a big catalyst for an executive order. At 50 million strong and with 60.2 percent of Latinos being U.S. born, they represent an electoral force that can make a great difference in 2012. States like Nevada, Virginia and North Caroline doubled their Latino population according to the U.S. Census and in states like Indiana and Ohio it's increased by 60 percent; representing critical states where Latinos could make a winning difference,
While most American simply default to oppose the DREAM Act, first introduced in August 1st of 2001 and recently rejected in December by the U.S. Senate, many don't realize that the nature and scope of it protects valuable educated, tax-paying and loyal assets to our country. It is not amnesty, it is not an immigration reform, it simply provides a path to legalization and documentation for many talented young people who are in college or serve our country in the military. Individuals must have come to the U.S. as a child (15 or under), graduated from a U.S. High School (or received a GED from a U.S. institution), and be a long-term resident (at least 5 years). Opposing to most people's misconception, it does not grant legal immigrant status. It gives a conditional non-immigrant the chance to earn legal immigrant status only after 2 years and only if he meets the DREAM Act's college or military service requirements, and other requirements, e.g., pays back taxes and demonstrates the ability to read, write, and speak English and demonstrates knowledge and understanding of the fundamentals of the history, principles, and form of government of the United States.
So, is it a burden or common sense to retain our educated talent? Whether you agree or disagree with the memo one thing is clear; winning with Latinos in politics and business is no longer an option but a reality to embrace. 50 million strong, representing a growth rate of 43 percent in the last decade, while contribution to 56 percent of U.S. growth is not insignificant. You be the judge of what this means to you, your business or your political view.

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