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In the Heat of the Night

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Uploaded on Apr 18, 2010

This video introduces the fascinating world of Hot Plants, flowers that generate heat (thermogenesis) to release scents and attract pollinators. We look at three thermogenic plant species, the monocots Philodendron bipinnatifidium and Colocasia esculenta and the eudicot, Nelumbo nucifera. Some plants such as Philodendron and Sacred lotus are also able to regulate their floral temperature, maintaining their flowers at up to 30 ˚C above air temperatures over several days. Our research team is investigating how plants produce this heat and how they can regulate their temperature so precisely. We are also interested in why the plants produce heat. Is it to release particular scents to attract pollinators, to give a heat reward to the insects or does it also help the plants reproductive development?
www.ChloroFilms.org

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