Upload

Loading icon Loading...

This video is unavailable.

Don't Believe Your Lying Eyes! (1/2)

Sign in to YouTube

Sign in with your Google Account (YouTube, Google+, Gmail, Orkut, Picasa, or Chrome) to like FFreeThinker's video.

Sign in to YouTube

Sign in with your Google Account (YouTube, Google+, Gmail, Orkut, Picasa, or Chrome) to dislike FFreeThinker's video.

Sign in to YouTube

Sign in with your Google Account (YouTube, Google+, Gmail, Orkut, Picasa, or Chrome) to add FFreeThinker's video to your playlist.

Uploaded on Apr 12, 2010

http://facebook.com/ScienceReason ... Don't Believe Your Lying Eyes! (Part 1/2). TED talks - Beau Lotto: Optical illusions show how we see (Recorded at TEDGlobal, July 2009, Oxford, UK).

A fascinating demonstration of how our visual system is conditioned by what we perceive as 'Reality', with unexpected conclusions about what we call Illusions.

---
Please SUBSCRIBE to Science & Reason:
http://www.youtube.com/FFreeThinker
http://www.youtube.com/ScienceTV
http://www.youtube.com/Best0fScience
http://www.youtube.com/RationalHumanism
---

Beau Lotto's color games puzzle your vision, but they also spotlight what you can't normally see: how your brain works. This fun, first-hand look at your own versatile sense of sight reveals how evolution tints your perception of what's really out there.

Neuroscientist and artist Beau Lotto is founder of Lottolab, a hybrid art studio and science lab. With glowing, interactive sculpture -- and good, old-fashioned peer-reviewed research -- he's illuminating the mysteries of the brain's visual system.

Why you should listen to him:

"Let there be perception," was evolution's proclamation, and so it was that all creatures, from honeybees to humans, came to see the world not as it is, but as was most useful. This uncomfortable place -- where what an organism's brain sees diverges from what is actually out there -- is what Beau Lotto and his team at Lottolab are exploring through their dazzling art-sci experiments and public illusions.

Their Bee Matrix installation, for example, places a live bee in a transparent enclosure where gallerygoers may watch it seek nectar in a virtual meadow of luminous Plexiglas flowers. (Bees, Lotto will tell you, see colors much like we humans do.) The data captured isn't just discarded, either: it's put to good use in probing scientific papers, and sometimes in more exhibits.

Outside the studio work, the brain-like (that is, multidisciplinary) organization is also branching out to bigger public engagement works. It's holding regular "synesthetic workshops" where kids and adults make "color scores" -- abstract paintings that computers interpret into music, as with scrolls fed to a player piano.

And lately they're planning an outdoor walkway of color-lit, pressure-sensitive John Conway-esque tiles that react and evolve according to foot traffic. These and Lotto's other conjurings are slowly, charmingly bending the science of perception -- and our perceptions of what science can be.

Beau Lotto teaches at University College London.

"All his work attempts to understand the visual brain as a system defined, not by its essential properties, but by its past ecological interactions with the world. In this view, the brain evolved to see what proved useful to see, to continually redefine normality." (British Science Association)

http://www.ted.com/speakers/beau_lott...
http://www.lottolab.org/
.

Loading icon Loading...

Loading icon Loading...

Loading icon Loading...

The interactive transcript could not be loaded.

Loading icon Loading...

Loading icon Loading...

Ratings have been disabled for this video.
Rating is available when the video has been rented.
This feature is not available right now. Please try again later.

Loading icon Loading...

Loading...
Working...
to add this to Watch Later

Add to