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13th century Medieval Music: Ductia

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Uploaded on Dec 22, 2008

As you can see, this is one of my older uploads, it is such a joyful music indeed.

That must be the reason of its popularity.
I have nowadays more adopted instruments for this type of music. Anyhow, this works too I guess...

about the Ductia on this webside:
http://aelflaed.homemail.com.au/doco/...
following:
There are no surviving manuscripts containing pieces labelled as ductias. Grochieo describes the ductia as like the estampie but more regular; perhaps this refers to an estampie with verses all of the same length. Musically speaking, it might be that an instrumental estampie with only three or four two-part verses (puncti) is a ductia (HAoM p220).

Grocheio also says (presumably about the vocal ductia): "The ductia is a melody that is light and brisk in its ascents and descents, and which is sung in carole by young men and girls, like the French song Chi encore querez amoretes. It influences the hearts of young girls and men and draws them from vanity, and is said to have power against that passion which is called love or 'eros'." (Rochefort p46)

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