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Radio-active: Internet Broadcasting and Artist Compensation

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Published on Nov 15, 2012

Radio-active: Internet Broadcasting and Artist Compensation

This panel was part of Future of Music Summit 2012 and was recorded live at New America Foundation in Washington, D.C. on November 13, 2012.

For more information on this event: http://futureofmusic.org/events/futur...

Today, fans have more ways than ever to discover music, and radio — whether webcast, satellite or good old fashioned over-the-air — is a major driver. But radio isn't just about finding new sounds; it's also a source of revenue for composers, songwriters and performing artists. But not all broadcasters pay all creators, and some don't pay at all. Additionally, the uneven royalty obligations among digital broadcasters have some complaining that the current rate-setting process is unsustainable. The recently-introduced Internet Radio Fairness Act (IRFA), seeks to abolish the current rate-setting standard for webcasters — including the popular "predictive radio" service Pandora. There is tremendous controversy around how this move might impact artist compensation, as the bill's approach to lowering webcasting rates is to move the royalty to the standard used for satellite radio. The bill's supporters say this will help grow the market and provide more earning opportunity for musicians. Critics say that there is no way such a move does not result in a substantial reduction of revenue for artists. Meanwhile, terrestrial radio still doesn't pay performers or labels. Many would agree that parity among radio services is a worthy goal. The question is what is ultimately "fair," and do artists get to have a say?

Kurt Hanson CEO, AccuRadio.com; Publisher, RAIN: Radio And Internet Newsletter
David Lowery University of Georgia/Cracker/Camper Van Beethoven
Michael Petricone Senior Vice President, Government Affairs, Consumer Electronics Association
Patricia Polach Of Counsel, Bredhoff & Kaiser, PLLC, and Associate General Counsel of American Federation of Musicians
Colin Rushing General Counsel, SoundExchange
Chris Richards Washington Post Pop Music Critic (moderator)

http://newamerica.net/events/2012/the...

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