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Te Matatini 2007

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Uploaded on Jun 7, 2007

Impression of the New Zealand National Kapa Haka Festival in Palmerston North.

KAPA HAKA
HE TOHU WHENUA RANGATIRA

KAPA: to stand in a row or rank
HAKA: to dance (the dance of Tanerore; the quivering of the air on a hot day)

Kapa Haka is commonly used to describe modern day performance of traditional and contemporary Maori song. The performance can be competitive or non competitive and can be performed by any number of people.

Modern performance is made up of the following disciplines:

Waiata-a-tira, group dynamics singing, examples being chorals and hymns.
Whakaeke, a choreographed entrance onto the performance area where elements of all disciplines are utilised. It is emphatic and must capture the audience from the very start.
Moteatea, usually traditional chants although contemporary compositions are becoming more common.
Poi, where the dancer (mainly female) manipulates a ball attached to a length of cord exhibiting the full ethos of grace, beauty, timing, precision and allure.
Waiata-a-ringa, a song where specific hand movements portray different meanings and combined create a story.
Haka, the war dance, that aspect of Maori culture which encourages freedom of expression, good or bad. The Haka has become the world renown symbol of New Zealand identity.
Whakawatea, a choreographed exit off the performance area where, once again, elements of all disciplines are utilised. Performers must leave the stage as they entered - forceful and unforgettable.
Manukura Wahine and Manukura Tane, female and male leaders of kapa haka, must lead and inspire and never forget their team. They are further expected to maintain their role off the stage in mentoring and serving the wider community.
Kakahu, dress, this discipline recognises the skills of Maori artists and craftsman including weavers, carvers, tuhi kiri, moko. The performers must do justice to the works of art they are wearing.
Te Reo, the Maori language, is the very essence of the Maori culture carrying, protecting, guiding and treasuring the past, present and future. Te Reo underpins all disciplines.
Kapa Haka celebrates Maori contribution to New Zealand's uniqueness in this modern world. Kapa Haka removes the battlefields of Maori ancestors with inherent competitiveness now taking place on stage. Kapa Haka recgonises the strength of diversity among Maori tribes, iwi, hapu, whanau, while equally encouraging all of us to come together and celebrate as one.

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