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Friday Night Trap Shooting

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Published on Oct 19, 2012

Trap shooting, a new experience for me and one that I have now shot into the matrix, filed under good times. Can't wait to get into this locally.

Trapshooting is one of the three major disciplines of competitive clay pigeon shooting (shotgun shooting at clay targets). The other disciplines are Skeet shooting and Sporting Clays. Within each discipline, there are variations.

Trapshooting is shot throughout the world's countries. Trapshooting variants include, but are not limited to international varieties Olympic trap, also known as "International Trap"; Double trap (also an Olympic event), Down-The-Line, also known as "DTL" and Nordic Trap. American Trap is the predominant version in the United States and Canada.
American Trap has two independent governing bodies. The Amateur Trapshooting Association (ATA) sanctions events throughout the United States and Canada, as well as the Pacific International Trapshooting Association (PITA) which sanctions events on the West Coast of North America.

Trapshooting was originally developed, in part, to augment bird hunting and to provide a method of practice for bird hunters. Use of targets, was introduced as a replacement for live pigeons. Indeed, one of the names for the targets used in shooting the games is clay pigeons. The layout of a modern trapshooting field differs from that of a Skeet field and/or a Sporting Clays course.

Trapshooting has been a sport since the late 18th Century when real birds were used; usually the Passenger Pigeon, which was extremely abundant at the time. Birds were placed under hats or in traps which were then released. Artificial birds were introduced around the time of the American Civil War. Glass Balls (Bogardus) and subsequently "clay" targets were introduced in the later 1800s,[citation needed], gaining wide acceptance, but shooting of live birds is still practiced in some parts of the United States.

Trapshooting is typically shot with a 12 gauge shotgun. Smaller gauge firearms can be used, but no allowance is given. Trapshooting events are either single or double target presentations.

Both general purpose shotguns and more specialized target-type shotguns are used in trapshooting. Examples of trap guns are single-barreled shotgun (such as the Browning BT-99, Perazzi MX-series, Krieghoff K-80, [Kolar] T/A) or a double barreled shotgun such as the Beretta DT10, Browning XT Trap, and SKB'S. Shooters who shoot all sub-events will often buy a combination-set of a single and double barrel for shooting both singles and double targets respectively. Self-loading (semi-automatic shotguns) are popular for recreational shooting due to the lower perceived recoil and versatility because they can be used for singles, handicap, and doubles. Shotguns used in trapshooting can differ from field and skeet guns in several ways and normally are designed with a higher "point of impact" as the targets are intended to be shot as they rise.

Trapshooting shotguns can be adjustable. Stocks may have a "Monte Carlo" (fixed, raised "comb") configuration and/or include a comb height adjustment, a butt plate adjustment for length, angle or both. Trap guns typically have longer barrels (750--850 mm, 30-34 inches), possibly with porting and featuring tighter chokes to compensate for the longer distances at which trapshooting targets are broken. The majority of trap shotguns built today feature interchangeable choke tubes as opposed to older guns which used chokes of a "fixed" constriction. Interchangeable choke tubes can come in a variety of constrictions and may use names such as "modified", "improved modified" and "full". Trap guns are built to withstand the demands and stress of constant and lengthy repeated use - 100s of shots in a single day of events, whereas typical field guns are built to be lighter, carried afield and not shot in such quantity.

Common accessories include wearing a vest or pouch that will hold at least 25-50 cartridges or "shells" for singles and/or doubles events. Most ranges and clubs require eye and ear protection.

Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons "Attribution 3.0" http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b...

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