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"Something told the wild geese" By Rachel Field Poem animation Early Television experiment

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Published on Feb 11, 2013

Here's a virtual movie of an early television experiment from 1941 By the great Scots born pioneer of television from Jellystone Park John Yogi Bear of the celebrated American poetess Rachel Field (1894-1942; "novelist, children's book author, playwright, and poet reciting her great poem "Something told the wild geese" This hauntingly beautiful, poem often heard as a song these days beautifully describes the migration of the Canada geese and the the coming of Autumn. The year 1941 in television involved some significant events. In 1941, the United States implemented 525-line television.By In 1943, RCA demonstrated a new TV Camera that gave the public its first glimpse of an image that was far above the images that had been possible in early television. In 1952, the National Association of Radio and Television Broadcasters established their own guidelines for content, in response to growing concerns of social critics. At least half of the code was governing advertising. A House subcommittee was also commissioned to investigate the "offensive" and "immoral" content of TV programs. The topics ranged from beer spots to dramas depicting suicide. In 1957, Variety reported that during a typical week, most viewers would see a total of 420 commercials and that they would occupy about 5 hours of a viewer's time. In December of that year, Edward R. Murrow wrote,"television in the main is being used to distract, delude, amuse and insulate us." But by 1955, Americans were becoming more prosperous and the price of a new television had decreased, largely because of the invention of the mass production of the glass picture tube mentioned above. A television was now only about the cost of a set of automobile tires. That put the cost within reach of about 67% of the United States public and television overtook radio as the focus of family evening entertainment.

Rachel Lyman Field (1894-1942) was an American novelist, poet, and children's fiction writer. She is best known for the Newbery Award-winning Hitty, Her First Hundred Years. Field also won a National Book Award, Newbery Honor award and two of her books are on the Lewis Carroll Shelf Award list.

Field was a descendant of David Dudley Field, the early New England clergyman and writer. She grew up in Stockbridge, Massachusetts. As a child, she contributed to the St. Nicholas Magazine. She was educated at Radcliffe College.
According to Ruth Hill Viguers, Field was "fifteen when she first visited Maine and fell under the spell of its 'island-scattered coast'. Calico Bush [1931] still stands out as a near-perfect re-creation of people and place in a story of courage, understated and beautiful."[1]
Field married Arthur S. Pederson in 1935, with whom she collaborated in 1937 on To See Ourselves. In 1938 one of her plays was adapted for the British film The Londonderry Air.[2] She was also successful as an author of adult fiction, writing the bestsellers Time Out of Mind (1935), All This and Heaven Too (1938), and And Now Tomorrow (1942). They were adapted as films produced under their own titles in 1947, 1940, and 1944 respectively.[citation needed] Field also wrote the English lyrics for that version of Franz Schubert's "Ave Maria" used in the Disney film Fantasia.[3]
Field is famous, too, for her poem-turned-song "Something Told the Wild Geese".[citation needed] She also wrote a story about the nativity of Jesus, "All Through the Night".
She moved to Hollywood, where she lived with her husband and two children.[4]
Rachel Field died at the Good Samaritan Hospital on March 15, 1942, of pneumonia following an operation.

Kind Regards

Jim Clark
All rights are reserved on this video recording copyright Jim Clark 2013

Something Told the Wild Geese...........

Something told the wild geese It was time to go.
Though the fields lay golden Something whispered - "Snow."
Leaves were green and stirring, Berries, luster-glossed,
But beneath warm feathers Something cautioned - "Frost."
All the sagging orchards Steamed with amber spice,
But each wild breast stiffened At remembered ice.
Something told the wild geese It was time to fly -
Summer sun was on their wings, Winter in their cry.

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