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Gambling with Secrets: Part 5/8 (Encryption Machines)

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Published on Mar 12, 2012

Explore how the one-time-pad was applied during WW2 with the use of rotor encryption machines. The German's Enigma machine would have been nearly impossible to break if it didn't rely on human operators making "random" choices.
This video purposely ignores many details of the Enigma (such as the plug-board) and how it was broken. The goal is to explain the strength of the machine in terms of the key space. Also, pseudorandom sequences (no matter how you generate them) require a random initial seed. This will be fleshed out in the final chapter on Public Key Cryptography.

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