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Public Lecture—Here Be Monsters: Tales of the Hot Universe

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Streamed live on Dec 3, 2013

(Lecture begins at 0:00:51)
Lecture Date: Tuesday December 3rd, 2013. In this talk, we embark on a remarkable adventure that explores the hottest and most powerful objects in the universe. Our travels take us from the millions of tiny black holes that live in our own galaxy, the Milky Way, to the huge ones lurking at the centers of all massive galaxies. We then explore the gigantic cosmic structures that are clusters of galaxies. These structures contain hundreds to thousands of galaxies, but more importantly a prodigious amount of hot gas heated to a million degrees. We will discuss how the interaction of the gas, the galaxies, and monstrous black holes make these clusters some the most powerful beacons of X-ray light in the cosmos.

Julie Hlavacek-Larrondo was raised in Montreal, Canada, and is originally half Chilean, half Czech. After obtaining bachelor's and master's degrees at the University of Montreal, where she focused on the kinematical analysis of three Sculptor Group galaxies, she started her PhD studies at Cambridge University in 2009. There she had the chance to work with one of the leading experts in black hole physics, Professor Andy Fabian, in a very stimulating research group. One of the main accomplishments of her PhD work was to study the properties of jetted outflows generated by supermassive black holes in the central galaxies of clusters located very far away. These galaxies are the largest galaxies in the universe, and should therefore contain the largest supermassive black holes. As soon as she finished her PhD, Julie was awarded a prestigious Einstein Fellowship from NASA, which she took to Stanford University. She recently accepted a tenure-track position at the University of Montreal, and will be moving back to Canada in July 2014. Lecturer: Julie Hlavacek-Larrondo, Stanford University - KIPAC

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