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Atoms In Motion iPad App Demo

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Uploaded on Dec 19, 2011

Demonstration of the "Atoms In Motion" app running on an iPad simulator. User interactions and gestures control the entire simulation.

Discover the fundamental nature of matter; everything is made of atoms. The atomic theory is brought to life in "Atoms in Motion" — a fully interactive atomistic simulation that uses sophisticated Molecular Dynamics (MD) algorithms to perform computational chemistry calculations right on your iPad. Such computations reveal the motions of atoms as they attract, repel, and collide with one another.

Fun for all ages -- in this simulation you control the atoms! With the tap of the finger you can add, delete, or highlight atoms within the simulation. With a gentle touch you can move, place, or throw atoms. With the swipe of a finger you can control the temperature and explore the states-of-matter (solids, liquids, and gases). Discover the physics behind the ideal gas laws, and perform your own experiments by changing the volume, the number of atoms in the simulation, or the temperature.

This Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation includes realistic interatomic potentials of four noble gas elements: Helium, Neon, Argon, and Krypton (the van der Waals forces are computed using a Lennard-Jones 6-12 potential). The MD simulation continuously computes the pressure, and dynamically plots the pressure versus temperature, volume, or the number of atoms. Users can vary the temperature from near absolute zero to over 500K, and add up to 1,000 atoms to the simulation.

http://www.atomsinmotion.com/

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