Upload

Loading icon Loading...

This video is unavailable.

Japan's Ramen Robot

Sign in to YouTube

Sign in with your Google Account (YouTube, Google+, Gmail, Orkut, Picasa, or Chrome) to like NTDTV's video.

Sign in to YouTube

Sign in with your Google Account (YouTube, Google+, Gmail, Orkut, Picasa, or Chrome) to dislike NTDTV's video.

Sign in to YouTube

Sign in with your Google Account (YouTube, Google+, Gmail, Orkut, Picasa, or Chrome) to add NTDTV's video to your playlist.

Uploaded on Aug 6, 2009

Japan's obsession with the machines has gone one step further with this creation a "ramen" noodle robot chef.

For more news and videos visit ☛ http://ntd.tv
Follow us on Twitter ☛ http://twitter.com/NTDTelevision
Add us on Facebook ☛ http://on.fb.me/s5KV2C

At the "Fua-men" ramen noodle shop in the central Japanese city of Nagoya, two robotic arms are busy serving their hungry customers, doling out nearly 80 bowls of noodles on a busy day.

Kenji Nagoya, the owner of the noodle shop and a robot manufacturer says nobody gets it as accurate as the robots.

[ Kenji Nagoya, Owner of Fua-men]:
"The benefits of using robots as ramen chefs include the accuracy of timing in boiling noodles, precise movements in adding toppings and consistency in the taste."

Nagoya's robot factory opened the noodle shop less than a month ago to showcase its latest robotic technology.

The noodle shop, which sells a regular noodle bowl with a pork broth-based soup for 7 dollars, is yet to make profit partly due to the large investment in the research and development of the robotic arms.

But the restaurant is definitely getting a lot of attention and building its reputation.

Customers say the noodles taste as good as those made by humans.

[Yoshikazu Yamada, First-time Customer]:
"I don't feel any difference in taste between this ramen and those cooked by a human chef."

Humans are not completely out of the equation and do have to step in occasionally to prepare the soup stock, take orders and receive money.

But the robot arms will take care of the rest. The machines are pre-programmed to boil noodles, pour the soup into bowls and sprinkle toppings.

Customers get to watch the whole process of the automated ramen-making, which takes one minute and 40 seconds per bowl.

During downtime, the robots entertain customers by demonstrating various tricks.

Loading icon Loading...

Loading icon Loading...

Loading icon Loading...

The interactive transcript could not be loaded.

Loading icon Loading...

Loading icon Loading...

Ratings have been disabled for this video.
Rating is available when the video has been rented.
This feature is not available right now. Please try again later.

Loading icon Loading...

Advertisement
Loading...
Working...
to add this to Watch Later

Add to