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Sharks at Palmyra Atoll

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Uploaded on Apr 14, 2011

Scientists have found that sharks and other large predators make up more than half the fish biomass at the Palmyra Atoll, an isolated and uninhabited string of islands in the Pacific Ocean owned by The Nature Conservancy. In contrast, marine systems that have been subject to human development, pollution and overfishing tend to be dominated by small plankton-eating fish and algae. We now know that lots of sharks and other predators mean strong reefs and healthy healthy fish populations. Palmyra can provide a baseline for both conservationists and fishery managers as they work to maintain healthy marine systems. Video taken by Dr. Gareth Williams, Scripps Institution of Oceanography.

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