Upload

Loading icon Loading...

This video is unavailable.

Bolshoi Ballet - Paquita Grand pas - w/ Zakharova 4/6

Sign in to YouTube

Sign in with your Google Account (YouTube, Google+, Gmail, Orkut, Picasa, or Chrome) to like Mr. Lopez 2681's video.

Sign in to YouTube

Sign in with your Google Account (YouTube, Google+, Gmail, Orkut, Picasa, or Chrome) to dislike Mr. Lopez 2681's video.

Sign in to YouTube

Sign in with your Google Account (YouTube, Google+, Gmail, Orkut, Picasa, or Chrome) to add Mr. Lopez 2681's video to your playlist.

Uploaded on Mar 22, 2009

**The origins of the variations -
1. Variation danced by Yekaterina Shipulina. Music by Riccardo Drigo (1903). Variation for Anna Pavlova. Taken from Petipa's 1868 grand ballet "Le Roi Candaule", which the Ballet Master revived in 1891 for Carlotta Brianza & then re-touched in 1903 for the ballerina Julia Sedova. The ballet combined Plutarch & Herodotus's tale of how the Shepherd Gyges usurped the throne of the Kingdom of Lydia from King Candaules via his Queen, Nyssia. In the context of the full-length ballet, this solo was performed during the celebrated bathing scene, when Nyssia dances to the sounds of her slave's harp. This solo is supposed to have a very prevalent solo for harp, but for some reason the Bolshoi has re-orchestrated the music so that the strings are more pronounced. It is still heard in Drigo's original orchestration at the Mariinsky, which can be heard/seen here - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hfy34v.... This was one of Pavlova's favorite variations - she danced it in many ballets (it can be found in a few of the Mariinsky's turn-of-the 20th century rehearsal répétiteurs). Pavlova was responsible for introducing it to "Paquita", as she used as the Prima ballerina's variation for her own performances in the ballet. It is important to point out that Pavlova would have performed this solo to a much quicker tempo than what is heard here.

2. Variation danced by Yekaterina Krysanova. Likely by Ludwig Minkus (year unkown). Variation for Olga Preobrajenska (?). This variation is known for being part of various stagings of the "Paquita" Grand pas. It also turns up in the Vaganova School's rarely seen "La Source" Pas de deux (which can be seen here - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aUCe7u...). Published piano scores credit the music to Drigo & as being one of the pieces written for Achille Coppini's 1902 staging of the Delibes/Minkus "La Source" at the Mariinsky. The music is certainly from Minkus's pen rather than Drigo's - the typically Minkus-ish orchestration & melody are a dead give away.

3. Variation danced by Natalia Osipova. Music by Ludwig Minkus (year unknown). Modern dancers & balletomanes will recognize this variation as being taken from various stagings of "Don Quixote", specifically the Mariinsky's production as a "flower girl" variation (seen here - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A7Tgf0...), but it is nowhere to be found in the original piano score of "Don Quixote". The Bolshoi's program credits this variation as being taken from Jules Perrot's 1855 grand ballet "Armida". Since Cesare Pugni wrote the score for that work it makes the authorship even more of a mystery. Interestingly, the music has the exact same melodic structure as Solor's variation from "La Bayadère" - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lVKb9V....

4. Variation danced by Mariana Ryzhkina. Music by Riccardo Drigo (1901). Variation for Pierina Legnani. When the great Legnani gave her final performance in Russia in 1901 before retiring to her native Italy, she performed in Lev Ivanov's revival of Petipa's 1872 "La Camargo", which told the story of how the 18th century dancer Marie Camargo & her sister Madeleine were abducted for one night by the Comte de Melun. Drigo wrote this variation especially for Legnani's performance, which is legendary in the annals of ballet history - on that evening she demonstrated just why she was the first to obtain the official title of 'Prima ballerina assoluta'. With regards orchestration, Drigo's music sounds nearly 100% authentic here, though I have no doubt that the harp is supposed to be accompanying the chords coming from the flutes.

5. Variation danced by Anna Antonicheva. Music by Riccardo Drigo (1888). Variation for Maria Anderson known as "L'amour". This variation is 1 of 4 pieces added by Drigo to Mikhail Ivanov's score for Petipa's colossal ballet of 1888 titled "La Vestale", which told the tale of a Vestal virgin in ancient Rome. This variation was danced by the character Cupid (hence its title), & performed to great acclaim by the ballerina Maria Anderson. Interestingly, when Tchaikovsky saw Mlle. Anderson in this role, he requested that she create the role of the White Cat in "The Sleeping Beauty"! Today, this solo survives at the Vaganova School under the title of "Vyestalka", the Russian title for Petipa's 1888 "La Vestale". As with a few other pieces by Drigo in this staging, we have yet another dodgy orchestration of his music, with Drigo's usual flare for orchestral color made rather dull by the Bolshoi musical director.

Loading icon Loading...

Loading icon Loading...

Loading icon Loading...

Loading icon Loading...

Ratings have been disabled for this video.
Rating is available when the video has been rented.
This feature is not available right now. Please try again later.

Loading icon Loading...

Loading...
Working...
to add this to Watch Later

Add to