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Police Confrontation And What To Do

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Uploaded on Oct 14, 2009

I want to speak specifically about when you are confronted or
approached by a police officer who is "supposed" to be a
public servant.

The reason I want to give you this information is because I
think it will be of increasing importance as our freedoms
deteriorate... (and they ARE deteriorating).

So, the directions I am passing along assume you haven't
done anything to breach the peace. If you have done something illegal, then you will have to face the consequences like a mature individual.

So the first thing you need to know (because knowledge is
power), is you are not obliged to give a police officer
any information or divulge anything as, "it can and WILL be
used against you in a court of law." They tell you this so
why would you want to give them anything - especially if you
haven't done anything!

But in NOT compromising your privacy, you may have to be
prepared to spend between (my guess) a couple hours to 48
hours in a cell but it won't always come to that and it will most likely only be a couple hours. If you are civil and stand firm in your power, you should be fine...

Let's hope you NEVER need this information.

So first, do not tell them your name, where you're going, where you've been, don't give them your ID. You are an anonymous, nobody, with no past or future. It is not their legal right to know if you have done nothing.

So now you know what NOT to say; here's what you SHOULD say if approached and questioned by a police officer...


Police: Hello, may I ask for your name and what you are doing?

You: (grab your cell phone and set to 'record audio' and hold
it up so they become aware that you are recording the
transaction. Then say) Hello, I recognize your contact. What is the nature of the intended detention?

Let's repeat that because it is important and you should think about what it means:

You: Hello, I recognize your contact. What is the nature of the intended detention?


The police officer may immediately tell you that you are not
allowed to record this conversation...

You: Did you witness me breach the peace?

Police: No.

You: I am now reserving my right not to talk to a peace
officer who has not witnessed me breach the peace - Thank
you and good day.


(If you have a video recording device and the officer says you can't film this conversation, you may say, "You are a public servant and it is my legal right to film you sir.")


If the police officer insists on questioning you...

Police: Can I see your identification please?

You: Am I obliged to carry identification?

Police: What is your name sir (or madam)?

You: Am I obliged to give you my name?



If the police officer says yes to either of your questions you can say...

You: By saying yes, you are acting fraudulently. Am I free
to go?


You must not be intimidated into giving up your privacy.
If a police officer approaches you on the street, he/she,
being a public servant, is under you! You are the master
and that is why you must begin questioning him (or her) instead of the other way around.

You see, until you HAVE done something to breach the peace, you are the master not the slave.

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