Upload

Loading icon Loading...

This video is unavailable.

Climbing Tools: Ropes Part 2

Sign in to YouTube

Sign in with your Google Account (YouTube, Google+, Gmail, Orkut, Picasa, or Chrome) to like mikebarter387's video.

Sign in to YouTube

Sign in with your Google Account (YouTube, Google+, Gmail, Orkut, Picasa, or Chrome) to dislike mikebarter387's video.

Sign in to YouTube

Sign in with your Google Account (YouTube, Google+, Gmail, Orkut, Picasa, or Chrome) to add mikebarter387's video to your playlist.

Uploaded on Apr 17, 2011

Now available anywhere with the new apple podcast app for the iphone and ipad. Just search climbing tools while at the gym.

I assume that this is mostly used by folks who are thinking about buying their first rope. Despite the fact that there can be as many as a dozen ropes or more in your local shop most of them will not apply to your needs. So here is a slight break down for your first rope.
If you are a mountaineer then weight is always a issue. No I am not saying your a fat pig and should be watching how many calories you consume. I am talking about the weight of the rope. For most glacier travel situations I will get the skinniest rope that I can. In fact I will often use a half rope for ski touring or something like that peak you see in the background at the opening of this vid. The other important thing is dry coating. This prevents water from getting absorbed by the nylon. Old frayed ropes can take on 10 pounds of water in a worse case scenario.
Rock climbers can save their money as it is of no value out on the crags and cliffs. As your first rope don't go buying anything to thin. Your looking for a rope in the 10.2 to 10.5 mm range. By the time you wear this rope out you are going to have a pretty good idea what you need as your next rope.
Single Rope: This is by far the most common rope used. It is what it sounds like. Designed to be used alone. Can withstand a number of fall factor 2 falls without failure. Used in all types of climbing.
Half/dual ropes: Far less common but most often used on routes that wander or where reduced energy on gear may make the difference between life and death. Often carried cause you can make longer rappels. The two ropes still weigh more then a single but is a good compromise when full length raps are required.
Twin Ropes: Same as above but both ropes must be clipped to the gear. The favorite rope of ice climbers.
Don't forget to donate a buck if you find these videos usefull.
Just go to http://www.mountainguide.com
The Mike

Hi
I am now booking guiding work. I have just been a stay at home Dad
for the last 4 years. Keen to get back to the mountain world. I know where there is some great rock in Mexico and Argentina. Thinking about a trip
to Aconcagua this January. Right now I will be spending the summer in Banff Canada. Contact me at any of the numbers below if your interested in
a canadian mountain adventure

http://www.mountainguide.com

Box 5936
Banff, AB
Canada T1L 1G8
mountainguide.com@me.com
iphone:1403 431 1821
Skype: mountainguide.com
I took a canoe across Canada

Climbing Tools Series
http://youtube.com/mikebarter387

  • Category

  • License

    Standard YouTube License

Loading icon Loading...

Loading icon Loading...

Loading icon Loading...

The interactive transcript could not be loaded.

Loading icon Loading...

Loading icon Loading...

Ratings have been disabled for this video.
Rating is available when the video has been rented.
This feature is not available right now. Please try again later.

Loading icon Loading...

Loading...
Working...
to add this to Watch Later

Add to