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Uploaded on Dec 6, 2011

PLATO courses provide students with a wide range of instructional feedback—both formal and informal. The various types of feedback go far beyond the basic task of telling learners if their answers are correct or incorrect. Activities in some courses use an informal style of feedback based on student self-assessment. For example, writing and math curricula include unjudged fill-in activities in which a mentor prompts students to try a certain writing strategy or explain a mathematical concept. Then learners use their own analytical skills to check their answers against a sample response. Similarly, courses at the high school and advanced levels contain lesson activities in which students write responses to a variety of open-ended prompts and check them against supplied sample answers or against a set of guidelines describing what would constitute a strong response.

PLATO courses also include interactions such as fill-in-the-blank questions, multiple-choice questions, and drag-and-drop matching activities that deliver more formal feedback. This feedback is tailored to anticipate errors that learners might make in determining their response, or to guide learners through the thinking process needed to arrive at the correct answer. Moreover, correct answer feedback often describes how and why a certain answer follows from the question posed, whether the learner sees that feedback on the first or a subsequent attempt at the question. This style of feedback is found throughout the courseware, in interactions within tutorials, in application or practice question sets, and in lesson activity sample answers.

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