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After the Flood: Salmon Donated to Local Tribes

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Uploaded on Nov 23, 2011

When the White River National Fish Hatchery in Bethel, Vermont was severely damaged by Hurricane Irene on August 28, 2011, 25 percent of the salmon brood stock was killed. The facility and the remaining fish were exposed to the possibility of fish pathogens and the invasive algae known as didymo, or "rock snot." The decision was made to then depopulate the facility so it can be cleaned and decontaminated. At the recommendation of the USFWS, the Connecticut River Atlantic Salmon Commission agreed to donate these fish, still viable for human consumption, to federally recognized Tribal governments in the northeast for use in traditional feasts, special events, ceremonies, or use in Tribal food banks, among other purposes. The first of the fish donated from the facility was to the Aroostook Band of Micmacs, a Tribe from Maine that historically harvested Atlantic salmon.

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