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BIGGER THAN A SHIP HORN OR TRAIN HORN! (N.A.S.A. Reverberant chamber HORN)

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Uploaded on Aug 1, 2009

I was told that this is a reverberant chamber horn used by NASA. Reverberant chamber is unique to NASA and the USAF for testing full-size aerospace components at high levels of sound pressure.
The noise in the chambers can be shaped to match the specifications of space shuttle and rocket launches, aircraft structural excitation, engine nacelle noise, unsteady turbulent airflows, and the acoustic test specifications required for military equipment sold on domestic and export markets. This flexibility has made it possible for to test satellites, satellite payload equipment, airframes, and aircraft components . Simply put, there is a enclosed room with this horn's opening bolted to the wall with the opening of the horn facing in. They would place the object they would want to test in that room, seal it up, and fire up this monster for a given lenght of time to see if it can handle the extreme low harmonics from this horn. The only problem is, the walls also started falling apart.
This horn has a working pressure between 250-500psi. On this test video 500psi was supplied (the squealing at the begining of each honk is normal. There is an exhaust port at the back of the power chamber housing to allow the titanium and tungsten diaphragm to vibrate at high pressure supply). This horn is 7' 5" long, and is 282lbs. This horn is no longer in used because the mortar of the building started coming apart from the testing that was done over the years.

This recording was done at Angeles Crest Hwy called "Echo Point" in Southern California about 400 feet away from the horn using a Panasonic AJ SDC915 with a Canon zoom lense, 2 Behringer B-5 condenser type microphones that require phantom power. Omnidirectional heads were also used on these microphones. One mic facing the horn with the volume at level 5(still getting some distortion), and the other facing away from the horn with the volume at level 8(to pick up the echo's).

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