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Kalpa, Yuga And Manvantara - Divisions Of Time In Hinduism

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Uploaded on Jan 15, 2009

Division Hinduism perceives time as cyclical based on our own experience of days and nights. We see this cyclical pattern in all divisions of time from days to epochs. Time is a never ending cyclical process which is both repetetive and exhaustive. In a sense time is limited. In another it is eternal. from a spiritual perspective time exists when we are in a state of duality,but disappears when we enter into a state of unity or samadhi. Each time cycle has three components, sristhti or creation, sthithi or continuation and laya or dissolution. They are under the control of the trinity namely Brahma, Vishnu and Siva. We can see the same divisions in a day also, In life we see them as childhood, adulthood and oldage. The Hindu calculation of time comes to us from the sage Ganita. He calculated the duration of each cycle in human years. He divided the cosmic time into Kalpas of 8.64 trillion years each, which is a day and night in the time and space of Brahman. Each kalpa is further divided into 100 mahayugas. Each mahayuga is again divided into four yugas namely Krita yuga, Treta yuga, Dwapara yuga and Kali yuga. Their duration vary. Krita is the longest and kali yuga the shortest. A day in the life of gods is equal to a year upon earth. It is divided into a day and night, known as uttarayana and dakshninayana. They are equal to 180 days each. There is another division of time known as Manvantara which is euqal to the period during which the earth is ruled by one particular Manu, the father of Man. A new Manu manifests at the beginning of each Manvantara to produce a new race of human beings. Each Manvantara lasts for about 71 Mahayugas in which appear along with Manu one Indra and seven seers. 14 Manus appear in each kalpa. The current Manu is known as Vaivasvata

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