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Nurdle Pollution?

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Uploaded on Jul 27, 2011

How Many of You Have Heard a Nurdle? Or even know what a nurdle is? Leslie Moyer of the 5 Gyres has the answer for you.

The nurdle is a pre-production plastic pellet that you see here in this jar. You'll find them in all of our beaches, unfortunately. This is not a good thing. All plastic starts its life out as a nurdle.

Every item that is made of plastic which is the majority of items in our world today starts as a tiny little nurdle pellet. That's right. You wouldn't think it, but plastic water bottles, plastic shampoo bottles, plastic cutlery; even the plastic chair you're sitting on started its life as a nurdle.

How are these nurdles ending up on our beaches worldwide?

It's generally assumed that through transportation, the nurdles are lost. They are very lightweight; they float on air currents and water currents quite easily. So if a container ship would happen to tip over and is full of nurdles, all of the contents of that container ship would fall into the ocean, all nurdles would start floating on their way down into our beaches and of course, into our oceans.

Animals and all other sea life are eating these nurdles for food so to help fight nurdle pollution, you can recycle and reuse to stop the demand for so many new items being made because they all start with the nurdle.

It is hard to imagine how we could help the pollution problem with nurdles because it is preproduction plastic—it's before we get our hands on it. But the closest we can come to helping with this problem is to stop buying as much plastic. With the demand going down, so is the price. We can reuse as much as possible. Stop buying disposable plastic to reduce the impact of these nurdles to the environment!

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