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Frankly Mr Shankly - The Smiths

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Uploaded on Feb 10, 2010

The Smiths were an English rock band formed in Manchester in 1982. Based on the songwriting partnership of Morrissey (vocals) and Johnny Marr (guitar), the band also included Andy Rourke (bass) and Mike Joyce (drums). Critics have called them the most important alternative rock band to emerge from the British independent music scene of the 1980s, and the group has had a major influence on subsequent artists. Morrissey's lovelorn tales of alienation found an audience amongst youth culture bored by the ubiquitous synthesizer-pop bands of the early 1980s, while Marr's complex melodies helped return guitar-based music to popularity in Britain.
The Queen Is Dead is the third studio album by the English rock band The Smiths. It was released on 16 June 1986 in the United Kingdom by Rough Trade Records. Sire Records released the album in the United States on 23 June 1986. The album reached number two on the UK charts, maintaining a chart residency for 22 weeks, and number 70 on the Billboard 200 and was certified Gold by the RIAA in late 1990, and it has sold consistently well ever since.
The album is popularly regarded as The Smiths' best album. With its unique blend of musical styles (including jangle pop, British Invasion, music hall, rockabilly and punk rock), it quickly became a British sensation and established The Smiths as one of the biggest bands of their era. Both Morrissey and Marr disagree, however, citing its 1987 successor (and unexpectedly final Smiths LP), Strangeways, Here We Come, as their peak.
Rolling Stone gave the album a five star rating. Reviewer Mark Coleman remarked on Morrissey's sense of humour and singled out the singer's performance on "Cemetry Gates" as a highlight. Coleman concluded, "Like it or not, this guy's going to be around for a while." Pitchfork Media ranked the album as the sixth best of the 1980s. In 2000, Mojo magazine placed "There Is a Light That Never Goes Out" at number 25 on their list of the 100 greatest songs of all time, while VH2 placed it top of their Top 500 Indie Songs chart. In 2003, The Queen Is Dead was ranked number 216 on Rolling Stone's list of The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time. In 2006 it was named the second greatest British album of all time by NME.
Dry humour (e.g. "Frankly, Mr. Shankly", allegedly a message to Rough Trade boss Geoff Travis disguised as a letter of resignation from a worker to his superior),
Billy Liar is about a guy who works in an undertakers in Bradford who wants to leave to write for a stand up comic. Billy drifts into a kind of fantasy world where he is doing what he wants to - "I want to live and I wat to love" echos this.

This is about a record executive for the Smith's record label. Morrissey had no respect for the guy. One day the exec showed Morrissey some poetry he had written, which Morrissey obviously didn't like ("I didn't realise you wrote such bloody awful poetry ")




LYRICS:

Frankly, Mr. Shankly, this position I've held
It pays my way, and it corrodes my soul
I want to leave, you will not miss me
I want to go down in musical history

Frankly, Mr. Shankly, I'm a sickening wreck
I've got the 21st century breathing down my neck
I must move fast, you understand me
I want to go down in celluloid history, Mr. Shankly


Fame, Fame, fatal Fame
It can play hideous tricks on the brain
But still I'd rather be Famous
Than righteous or holy, any day
Any day, any day


But sometimes I'd feel more fulfilled
Making Christmas cards with the mentally ill
I want to live and I want to Love
I want to catch something that I might be ashamed of


Frankly, Mr. Shankly, this position I've held
It pays my way and it corrodes my soul
Oh, I didn't realise that you wrote poetry
I didn't realise you wrote such bloody awful poetry, Mr. Shankly


Frankly, Mr. Shankly, since you ask
You are a flatulent pain in the arse
I do not mean to be so rude
Still, I must speak frankly, Mr. Shankly

Oh, give us your money !

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