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Bing Crosby - I'll Be Seeing You 1944 - Plus Studio Rehearsal Clip

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Uploaded on Jul 31, 2011

I added the sound clip at the end, with Bing in the studio recording it. So enjoy the full song plus the studio bonus. I also have the early recording of this song by the Ambrose orchestra on my music list.
"I'll Be Seeing You" is a popular song, with music by Sammy Fain and lyrics by Irving Kahal. Published in 1938, the song was inserted into the Broadway musical Right This Way, which closed after fifteen performances.
The musical theme has emotional power, and was much loved during World War II. It became an anthem for those serving overseas (both British and American soldiers) . The lyrics begin, in Ambrose's recorded version, with a preamble:
Cathedral bells were tolling and our hearts sang on;
Was it the spell of Paris or the April dawn?
Who knows if we shall meet again?
But when the morning chimes ring sweet again...
I'll be seeing you in all the old familiar places [etc.]
As the song develops, the words take a jaunty commonplace of casual farewell and transform it by degrees, to climax with
...and when the night is new,
I'll be looking at the moon,
But I'll be seeing you.
The resemblance between the main tune's first four lines and a passage within the theme of the last movement of Gustav Mahler's Third Symphony (1896) was pointed out by Deryck Cooke in 1970
Featured throughout the 1944 movie also titled I'll be Seeing You, starring Ginger Rogers and Joseph Cotten, the recording by Bing Crosby became a hit that year, being number one for the week of July 8. In 1956, Jackie Gleason's character, Ralph Kramden, referenced the song on a episode of The Honeymooners in which Kramden experienced an early exit on the game show, The $99,000 Answer, and refused to leave the stage. Later, the song became notably associated with Liberace, as the theme music to his television show of the 1950s. The song was heard on an episode of the 1960s spy spoof Get Smart, when the main character had a high-tech trumpet that could play any tune, just by speaking the title into the mouthpiece. It has also been played in the 1989 Woody Allen film Crimes and Misdemeanors; in the end credits of the 1990 film Misery; in the 1992 movie Shining Through; in the closing episode of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine'; in the 2004 film The Aviator, and in the 2004 film The Notebook as the song for Noah and Allie. It was also played in the closing credits for the final episode of Beavis and Butthead. During the 2009 Academy Awards presentation, Queen Latifah sang the song during the 'In Memoriam' tribute to members of the motion picture industry who had died during the previous year, which was controversial because the In Memoriam tribute was previously traditionally unaccompanied.

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