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Erno Rapee's Orchestra - This Is The Mrs, 1930

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Published on Apr 16, 2012

This Is The Mrs (Brown /Henderson) -- Erno Rapee's Orchestra, Featuring Paul Small, Hit of the Week 1930 (USA)

NOTE: Ernö Rapée (or Erno Rapee) (b. 1891 in Budapest, Hungary -- d. NYC 1945) American virtuoso pianist and symphonic conductor, the head conductor of the Radio City Symphony Orchestra. Rapée is also remembered for popular songs that he wrote in the late 1920s for the silent films. In 1926 he collaborated with composer Lew Pollack on "Charmaine" for the film What Price Glory? (1926), "Diane" for the Fox Film production, Seventh Heaven (1927), and "Marion" for the Fox production 4 Devils (1928).
Rapée studied as a pianist and later conductor at the Royal National Academy of Music in Budapest, Hungary. Later, he was assistant conductor to Ernst von Schuch in Dresden. After a tour of America as a guest conductor, he began performing at the Rialto Theater in New York, where he began composing and conducting for silent films. Following positions at the Rialto and Rivoli theaters, he was hired by Samuel "Roxy" Rothafel as the musical director of the Capitol Theatre's orchestra in New York. Rapée's next move was to Philadelphia, where he conducted an orchestra at the Fox Theatre. After his tenure at the Fox, Rapée went on to international success in Berlin with an orchestra at the UFA Theater. While there he was invited to conduct the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra. In 1926, he returned to America and began an engagement at the Roxy Theatre in New York. In March 1927 he directed the 110-player Roxy Symphony Orchestra. (At the time this was world's largest permanent orchestra). Millions of listeners heard his symphonic concerts over the air on Sunday afternoon during The Roxy Hour radio broadcasts.In 1932, Rapée reached the apex of his career as the musical director and head conductor of the symphony orchestra at Roxy Rothafel's new Radio City Music Hall, a position Rapée held until his death in 1945, in New York City, from a heart attack.

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