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This video is unlisted. Only those with the link can see it. Azrael--Irish Sport Horse--Free Jumping, 06/25/07

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Published on Jun 27, 2007

This is Azrael, my Irish Sport Horse yearling colt, doing a tiny cross-rail for fun in the indoor ring. He did some awesome flying lead changes and clearly has no difficulty jumping this little obstacle! The cutest part of the day unfortunately wasn't caught on tape. About half way through our session, we decided to take a brake to make sure the little guy would still let me catch him. Even after chasing him with the lounge whip, he let me walk right up to him, and after a few seconds of praise, he decided to follow me... even as I walked over the cross-rail. He's so brave and trusting. I couldn't be any prouder! Thanks to Bri for filming and Melinda for helping me chase him around and making the video. [Music by Nine Inch Nails]


And in case you're one of "those" youtubers...

The following excerpt by Volker Ehlers, Vice President of Glenwood Farms Hanoverians, Inc., and an international Grand Prix rider, gives a well thought-out and
practical regimen for teaching free Jumping to your horse. The full article can be found at: http://www.nawpn.org/freejumping.pdf

"At the start of teaching free jumping, it is important to adjust the distance between the jumps
according to the stride of the horse. At this point we do not try to teach the horse to adjust his
stride to a difficult distance. Even though we have talked about 21 feet as being one stride length
between fences, it is a little bit difficult to talk about the exact number of feet to put between the
two poles. The length of stride depends upon the horse. If it is a yearling, the stride would be
approximately 18 feet. If it is a two year old, the stride would be 18-20 feet. A three year old
should have 21 feet as the distance between two small fences. Some people might raise their
eyebrows at the free jumping of a yearling or two year old. If you keep the fences simple and low
and the encouragement easy, nothing bad will happen to the young horse. If you are raising
jumpers, it is important to evaluate the potential of your offspring. If they have no talent for
jumping, you can see it early enough and decide that your horse is more suitable for dressage.
Always think that free jumping is on one hand a tool to determine if your horse is a jumper
prospect or, on the other hand, a gymnastic exercise and a change of routine for your dressage
horse."

For all of the monkeys out there looking to do whatever they see, this is not an instructional video. The blurb above is not mine and--if you can READ--is not implemented in the video. At this point in his life, this horse was not asked to do anything other than the single cross-rail seen in the video. The point of the blurb is to show that jumping a yearling is NOT going to hurt the horse so long as the jump is low and the horse is not pushed too hard.

End of discussion.

This is Azrael, my Irish Sport Horse yearling colt, doing a tiny cross-rail for fun in the indoor ring. He did some awesome flying lead changes and clearly has no difficulty jumping this little obstacle! The cutest part of the day unfortunately wasn't caught on tape. About half way through our session, we decided to take a brake to make sure the little guy would still let me catch him. Even after chasing him with the lounge whip, he let me walk right up to him, and after a few seconds of praise, he decided to follow me... even as I walked over the cross-rail. He's so brave and trusting. I couldn't be any prouder! Thanks to Bri for filming and Melinda for helping me chase him around and making the video. [Music by Nine Inch Nails]

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