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Bird Wars 1 Hawk vs. 5 Crows

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Uploaded on Dec 5, 2008

Video shows a bird war. At least 5 crows attack a red-tailed hawk, as a group of deer watch. Hawks are dangerous, though, and pretty soon the hawk is fed up. It then takes out after a crow.

**The red tailed hawk, Buteo jamaicensis, is a large powerful bird. It can weigh around 2-4 lbs. and has almost a six-foot wingspan. They have a sharp, strong, powerful beak and curved talons. They tear prey apart with their beaks. The red tails of these hawks showed up several times.

A group of crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos) is called a "murder," and the video shows why. Although crows might be called songbirds, they can be very vicious. They can try to peck the brains out of other birds.

Crows are very intelligent, use tools, and are near the top of the animal IQ scale. Crows show linguistic capabilities and an ability to relay information over great distances. They live in complex, hierarchic societies involving hundreds of individuals having various "occupations." Wild hooded crows in Israel have learned to use breadcrumbs for bait fishing. Crows will engage in mid-air jousting, or air-"chicken" to establish pecking order.

The New Caledonian Crow has also been studied recently because of its ability to manufacture and use its own tools in the day-to-day search for food. This includes dropping seeds into a heavy trafficked street and waiting for a car to crush them open. They can manufacture a large variety of tools by plucking, smoothing and bending twigs and grass stems to procure a variety of foodstuffs. Queensland Australia crows have learned how to eat the toxic cane toad by flipping the cane toad on its back and violently stabbing the throat where the skin is thinner, allowing the crow to access the non-toxic innards.

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