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Pachelbel (Schubart?) "An Wasserflüssen Babylon" Weimarer Orgeltabulatur

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Uploaded on Feb 20, 2009

Gilberto Guarino plays, for the first time in Brasil and in the Internet, Johann Pachelbel's (Schubart's?) Chorale "An Wasserflüssen Babylon", included in the "Weimarer Orgeltabulatur", a document of historical and musical importance, discovered in 2006, in the Anna Amalia Library, in city of Weimar, Germany.
The three works by Pachelbel, the great Master of Nüremberg (Schubart?...) (Chorale "Kyrie, Gott Vater im Ewigkeit" and the Fugue in B minor, ornamented by Bach) already count with a world première recording: "J. S. Bachs früheste Notenhandschriften", played by organist Jean-Claude Zehnder for the "Edition Bach-Archiv" -- Carus 83.197. The organ is the great Arp Schnitger in St. Jacobi, Hamburg, Germany".
As for the works by Pachelbel (Schubart?), it is predominantly acknowledged they were copied by Johann Martin Schubart, a longtime pupil of Sebastian Bach's, and who later on would be the organist in Weimar. Nevertheless, some scholars (v.g., Christoph Wolff) claim that such pieces are actually by Schubart himself, not by Pachelbel (we can also hypothesize it was a kind of canonic exercise --basically "Kyrie, Gott ,Vater in Ewigkeit", written by Pachelbel for didatic purposes).
The manuscript is the bachian earliest source of copies of music by J. A. Reinken and Dieterich Buxtehude, (the Fantasia Chorales "An Wasserflüssen Babylon" and "Nun freut euch, lieben Christen g'mein", BuxWV 210). These copies stem from Bach's own hands, and were the result of his efforts during his early Ohrdruf (1695-1700) and Lüneburg (1700-1702?) years of apprenticeship.
Last but not least, "Weimarer Orgeltabulatur" is the strongest evidence in favor of the assertion that Bach actually studied under the guidance of Georg Böhm, who should then be more than simply "the Lüneburg organist".

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