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Wreckage of Crashed B-25 Mitchell Bomber - Part 1

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Uploaded on Nov 14, 2007

(Kindle eBook) Bushwhack - http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003... - a serial story of off trail hiking in the pacific northwest.
1944. The Third Reich. The United States airforce launches a campaign of precision daylight bombing missions on targets within Germany's mighty industrial complex while the British Royal airforce concentrates on carpet-bombing German civilian targets during the night. On the ground, the allied advance continues eastward towards the heart of the Nazi war machine. Hidden in secret cashes around Berlin, invading allied troops discover vast amounts of war booty, pillaged and looted by the German Military from all over Europe.
A United States airforce B-25 Mitchell bomber survives the anti aircraft fire and swarms of night-fighters in the skies over Germany and is sold to the Canadian military after World War 2. The twin-engine bomber is converted into a cargo plane by the Canadian airforce for the soul purpose of carrying valuable military cargo. Stationed just outside of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, the B-25 now proudly shows the air force insignia of Canada on her wings.
On the morning of the fifth of January, 1953, ground crews spot a highly sensitive cargo being secretly loaded by special personnel into the bomb bay of the B-25. They are strongly advised not to talk about what they witnessed. A flight plan is filed outlining the journey to Sea Island Airport, just outside of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. The cargo manifest lists the cargo hold as empty, and the flight is logged as a routine training mission. Captain Jack McIntosh is pilot and is a decorated war veteran of many bombing missions in the skies over Nazi Germany.
Information is leaked that the B-25 was carrying eight hundred thousand dollars in cash and gold bullion to pay military personnel stationed on the west coast. Marked with swastikas, also on board were crates that were from Adolf Hitler's personal hoard of the spoils of his war.
Part of Hitler's personal hoard and allegedly aboard the ill fated B-25, was the Spear of Destiny; the Roman spear that pierced the side of Jesus Christ as he hung from the cross as described in John 19 31 37. It is said that who ever holds the Spear of Destiny shall rule the world; good or evil.
In 1938 Adolf Hitler ordered an armoured company of SS troops to seize the Spear of Destiny from a museum in Vienna when he invaded Austria.
Fanatical Nazi Zealots claim that the Spear of Destiny that the United States returned to the Hofburg Museum in Vienna was a fake and that the real Spear of Destiny was flown out of Germany by the United States airforce.
The weather forecast for January 15th, 1953, called for clear skies during the day with squalls and storms in the evening. At the time of the crash the skies were clear.
The official explanation for the crash states that freezing rain jammed the bomber's wing flaps. According to this government-supplied theory the plane, caught in an ice storm and unable to maintain altitude due to iced up wing flaps, hit the lip of a ridge, ripping open the fuselage and spilling cargo across the top of the ridge as well as into a canyon below. The cash, gold and spoils of war may still be within the debris-field.
If the wing flaps were frozen and the bomber was struggling to maintain altitude it would have been under full throttle and the propellers would have been spinning at maximum R P M at the time of impact. At the time of the crash the bomber's propellers were in a feathered position and were not spinning, as can be clearly seen in this photo taken in 2004. The wreckage did not burn, indicating that the fuel tanks were empty and the engines were not running when the aircraft slammed into the high-altitude ridge over Pitt Lake on its final approach to the Sea Island airport. Was the lack of fuel deliberate sabotage, or human error?
Hours after the crash a classic South-East storm blew into the coastal mountains around Vancouver, dumping snow on the wreckage and creating blizzard conditions at higher altitudes. The initial search was immediately called off as survival in the open after a severe plane crash was impossible.
The following April, an extensive search by military personnel successfully located the wreckage and removed the bodies. The military search and rescue personnel piled other remains, including parachutes, suitcases, jackets, boots, personal possessions, maps and classified documents, and burned them on-site. They also left an aluminium plaque stating that the wreckage was already located and not to report it. When an aircraft is carrying valuable cargo they carry these plaques on board, according to an ex-air force officer.

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