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How Burger-shaped Water Drops Help Explain Twinned Rainbows

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Uploaded on Dec 2, 2011

As they started running various simulations, computer scientists at the Jacobs School of Engineering realized that the interaction of light with spherical drops could not explain some kinds of rainbows, such as twinned rainbows. Scientists turned to research showing that, as a water drop falls, air pressure flattens the bottom of it and shapes it like a burger. Jensen and his team called these slightly deformed water drops "burgeroids." "It's not a very mathematical term, but we like to use it," Jensen said. Simulations based on the so-called burgeroids, rather than on spherical drops of water, allowed the researchers to replicate a wide range of rainbows found in nature.

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