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Prison Break: California Rethinks Criminal Justice | KQED This Week

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Published on Aug 23, 2012

A co-production of KQED and the Center for Investigative Reporting

In October 2011, California began an unprecedented overhaul of its criminal justice system. Under federal court order to reduce prison overcrowding and improve inmate health care in the midst of the state's budget crisis, Gov. Jerry Brown's Public Safely Realignment Act shifts supervision for thousands of low level offenders to local and county jails and probation departments.

The Center for Investigative Reporting's Michael Montgomery goes behind the scenes to find out how it's working for corrections officials and offenders in San Francisco and Fresno counties. Host Scott Shafer hears from Los Angeles District Attorney Steve Cooley and San Francisco District Attorney George Gascon about their perspectives on how realignment impacts public safety and the system.

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