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protestant7

Vivaldi - Gloria in D major, RV 589 / Rinaldo Alessandrini Play

Antonio Vivaldi (1678~1741)

- Gloria in re maggiore, RV 589 -

(per 3 voci soliste, coro, tromba, oboe, violino [a piacere] 2 viole, 2 violoncelli, archi e basso continuo)


I. 'Gloria in excelsis Deo' (Coro)
II. 'Et in terra pax hominibus' (Coro)
III. 'Laudamus te' (Aria duetto)
IV. 'Gratias agimus tibi' (Coro)
V. 'Propter magnam gloriam tuam' (Coro)
VI. 'Domine Deus' (Aria)
VII. 'Domine Fili Unigenite' (Coro)
VIII. 'Domine Deus, Agnus Dei' (Aria, solo e coro)
IX. 'Qui tollis peccata mundi' (Coro)
X. 'Qui sedes ad dexteram Patris' (Aria)
XI. 'Quoniam tu solus Sanctus' (Coro)
XII. 'Cum Sancto Spiritu' (Coro)


Deborah York (soprano)
Patrizia Biccirè (soprano)
Sara Mingardo (alto)

Akademie Vocal Ensemble
Concerto Italiano (period instruments orchestra)

Rinaldo Alessandrini (conductor)

Marin Marais - Alcyone / Jordi Savall Play

Marin Marais (1656~1728)

《Alcyone》tragédie en musique, 1706

Le Concert des Nations
Jordi Savall (conductor)


Marin Marais (31 May 1656, Paris 15 August 1728, Paris) was a French composer and viol player. He studied composition with Jean-Baptiste Lully, often conducting his operas, and with master of the bass viol Monsieur de Sainte-Colombe for 6 months. He was hired as a musician in 1676 to the royal court of Versailles. He did quite well as court musician, and in 1679 was appointed "ordinaire de la chambre du roy pour la viole", a title he kept until 1725.

He was a master of the basse de viol, and the leading French composer of music for the instrument. He wrote five books of Pièces de viole (1686-1725) for the instrument, generally suites with basso continuo. These were quite popular in the court, and for these he was remembered in later years as he who "founded and firmly established the empire of the viol" (Hubert Le Blanc, 1740). His other works include a book of Pièces en trio (1692) and four operas (1693-1709), Alcyone (1706) being noted for its tempest scene.

Titon du Tillet included Marais in Le Parnasse françois, making the following comments on two of his pieces:

A piece from his fourth book entitled The Labyrinth, which passes through various keys, strikes various dissonances and notes the uncertainty of a man caught in a labyrinth through serious and then quick passages; he comes out of it happily and finishes with a gracious and natural chaconne. But he surprised musical connoisseurs even more successfully with his pieces called La Gamme [The Scale], which is a piece de symphonie that imperceptibly ascends the steps of the octave; one then descends, thereby going through harmonious songs and melodious tones, the various sounds of music.

As with Sainte-Colombe, little of Marin Marais' personal life is known after he reached adulthood. Marin Marais married a Parisian, Catherine d'Amicourt, on September 21, 1676. They had 19 children together.

Facsimiles of all five books of Marais' Pièces de viole are published by Éditions J.M. Fuzeau. A complete critical edition of his instrumental works in seven volumes, edited by John Hsu, is published by Broude Brothers. Marais is credited with being one of the earliest composers of program music. His work The Gallbladder Operation, for viola da gamba and harpsichord, includes composer's annotations such as "The patient is bound with silken cords" and "He screameth."



- Alcyone (French Opera) -

Alcyone is an opera by the French composer Marin Marais. It takes the form of a tragédie en musique in a prologue and five acts. The libretto, by Antoine Houdar de la Motte, is based on the Greek myth of Ceyx and Alcyone as recounted by Ovid in his Metamorphoses. The opera was first performed at the Académie royale de musique, Paris on 18 February 1706. The score is particularly famous for the storm scene (tempête) in Act Four. The Marche pour les Matelots, also part of this movement, became popular as a dance tune and is the basis of the Christmas carol Masters in this Hall.
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