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Artis Wodehouse

Percy Grainger Immovable Do Mustel Artis Wodehouse

1,278 views 9 months ago
Artis Wodehouse performs Percy Grainger's (1882 -1961) Immovable Do 6/12/13 at Church of the Epiphany, NYC. Grainger was an important international virtuoso pianist and composer, and a musician with unusually broad interests. He owned and wrote music for reed organs and harmoniums.

The Immovable Do is subtitled "The Cyphering C", and refers to a common mechanical defect - called a cypher - that can develop in harmoniums and reed organs. A cypher is a note that sounds continuously, even though its corresponding key has not been depressed. Considered a nuisance, Grainger uses this defect (a cypher) instead as a point of departure, and specifies that a high C should continuously sound during the performance. In Wodehouse's performance, the high C is played by Epiphany's beautiful Aeolian-Skinner pipe organ: the note is held down by lead weights placed by Wodehouse before she performs the rest of the piece on her 1903 Mustel Art harmonium.

Grainger espoused an elastic scoring technique to enable groups of all sizes and combinations of instruments to give effective performances of his music. Thus, The Immovable Do (or "The Cyphering C") was "tone-wrought " by Grainger either "for Organ, or Mixed Chorus, (with or without Organ or other instruments), or Full Orchestra, or Strings or Wind Band, or various Wind Groups".
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Artis Wodehouse performs Percy Grainger's (1882 -1961) Immovable Do 6/12/13 at Church of the Epiphany, NYC. Grainger was an important international virtuoso pianist and composer, and a musician with unusually broad interests. He owned and wrote music for reed organs and harmoniums.

The Immovable Do is subtitled "The Cyphering C", and refers to a common mechanical defect - called a cypher - that can develop in harmoniums and reed organs. A cypher is a note that sounds continuously, even though its corresponding key has not been depressed. Considered a nuisance, Grainger uses this defect (a cypher) instead as a point of departure, and specifies that a high C should continuously sound during the performance. In Wodehouse's performance, the high C is played by Epiphany's beautiful Aeolian-Skinner pipe organ: the note is held down by lead weights placed by Wodehouse before she performs the rest of the piece on her 1903 Mustel Art harmonium.

Grainger espoused an elastic scoring technique to enable groups of all sizes and combinations of instruments to give effective performances of his music. Thus, The Immovable Do (or "The Cyphering C") was "tone-wrought " by Grainger either "for Organ, or Mixed Chorus, (with or without Organ or other instruments), or Full Orchestra, or Strings or Wind Band, or various Wind Groups". Show less

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