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G20 Special Representative to Support Australia's G20 Sherpa - Daniel Sloper

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Interviewer: Today I'm joined by Daniel Sloper from the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade in Canberra. The Australian Government has appointed Daniel as G20 Special Representative to support Australia's G20 Sherpa and conduct outreach on the G20 during Australia's presidency.

Special Representative's on Twitter - https://twitter.com/G20SR

Also see - Chair of the G20 Development Working Group, Clare Walsh - http://youtu.be/OC3ZUGS-KFk and G20 Global Partnership for Financial Inclusion - Rebecca Bryant - http://youtu.be/kb_1hpOCRs8


Daniel, thank you for your time today.

Daniel Sloper: Not at all, it's a pleasure to be here.

Interviewer: Can you tell me a bit about your role?

Daniel Sloper: Sure, as Special Representative, I'm required, on behalf of the G20 as a whole, to conduct engagement with non-G20 government members, stakeholders such as NGOs and others, and also regional international organisations.

In doing so I have to articulate clearly the G20's agenda, listen to the views of others and see what other ideas there might be so we can prosecute that at the end of this year through the leaders' summit. Of course I'm not the only one responsible for outreach.

This is led by the head of our government -- the Prime Minister,
who holds the presidency this year for the G20 -- the foreign minister, the treasurer, the trade minister as well, as they each have respective meetings and the employment minster through the year. Through those different means and my own outreach we hope to listen to others through the year and their views.

Interviewer: What does the G20 want to achieve this year?

Daniel Sloper: The G20 at the end of the year in November, really wants leaders to come together and give a commitment to action: concrete, practical action to lift economic growth and job opportunities globally. Growth projections over the last few years have not been the same they were before the Global Financial Crisis.

What we're looking for now is G20 members to look domestically at what action they can take to complement the collective action to strengthen the global economy in recent years. This won't be easy -- it will be difficult. We have set a quantitative target. Finance Ministers in February agreed that we would over the next five years try to lift our economic growth above the trajectory forecast by more than 2 percent.

So we're talking about structural reform, something that is never easy but if we can set those
macroeconomic policies, increase investment, look at trade as a driver for growth, exchange ideas about employment policies we put in place the settlings to allow that growth to occur.

Interviewer: What affect does the G20's actions have on the global economy?

Daniel Sloper: Perhaps I'll answer that by first noting some characteristics about the G20. This is an organisation that represents 85 percent of global GDP, approximately 75 percent of trade, 65 percent of the world's population, a major source of foreign direct investment.

So clearly when leaders come together and achieve consensus they can drive change and have a positive impact on the global economy. We saw this in response to the Global Financial Crisis, now we are looking ahead and trying to achieve sustained, balanced growth.

As I said before, that refers to domestic action, but needs to go beyond that and consider what impact our policy agenda has on others. So we also do work, for example, on the development agenda, where we are trying to look for coherence and assist emerging economies attract private investment, improve their taxation regimes, have access to formal financial services and continuing good work on food security and human resource development.

Interviewer: Daniel, thank you for your time today.

Daniel Sloper: Not at all, thank you.
Read more
Interviewer: Today I'm joined by Daniel Sloper from the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade in Canberra. The Australian Government has appointed Daniel as G20 Special Representative to support Australia's G20 Sherpa and conduct outreach on the G20 during Australia's presidency.

Special Representative's on Twitter - https://twitter.com/G20SR

Also see - Chair of the G20 Development Working Group, Clare Walsh - http://youtu.be/OC3ZUGS-KFk and G20 Global Partnership for Financial Inclusion - Rebecca Bryant - http://youtu.be/kb_1hpOCRs8


Daniel, thank you for your time today.

Daniel Sloper: Not at all, it's a pleasure to be here.

Interviewer: Can you tell me a bit about your role?

Daniel Sloper: Sure, as Special Representative, I'm required, on behalf of the G20 as a whole, to conduct engagement with non-G20 government members, stakeholders such as NGOs and others, and also regional international organisations.

In doing so I have to articulate clearly the G20's agenda, listen to the views of others and see what other ideas there might be so we can prosecute that at the end of this year through the leaders' summit. Of course I'm not the only one responsible for outreach.

This is led by the head of our government -- the Prime Minister,
who holds the presidency this year for the G20 -- the foreign minister, the treasurer, the trade minister as well, as they each have respective meetings and the employment minster through the year. Through those different means and my own outreach we hope to listen to others through the year and their views.

Interviewer: What does the G20 want to achieve this year?

Daniel Sloper: The G20 at the end of the year in November, really wants leaders to come together and give a commitment to action: concrete, practical action to lift economic growth and job opportunities globally. Growth projections over the last few years have not been the same they were before the Global Financial Crisis.

What we're looking for now is G20 members to look domestically at what action they can take to complement the collective action to strengthen the global economy in recent years. This won't be easy -- it will be difficult. We have set a quantitative target. Finance Ministers in February agreed that we would over the next five years try to lift our economic growth above the trajectory forecast by more than 2 percent.

So we're talking about structural reform, something that is never easy but if we can set those
macroeconomic policies, increase investment, look at trade as a driver for growth, exchange ideas about employment policies we put in place the settlings to allow that growth to occur.

Interviewer: What affect does the G20's actions have on the global economy?

Daniel Sloper: Perhaps I'll answer that by first noting some characteristics about the G20. This is an organisation that represents 85 percent of global GDP, approximately 75 percent of trade, 65 percent of the world's population, a major source of foreign direct investment.

So clearly when leaders come together and achieve consensus they can drive change and have a positive impact on the global economy. We saw this in response to the Global Financial Crisis, now we are looking ahead and trying to achieve sustained, balanced growth.

As I said before, that refers to domestic action, but needs to go beyond that and consider what impact our policy agenda has on others. So we also do work, for example, on the development agenda, where we are trying to look for coherence and assist emerging economies attract private investment, improve their taxation regimes, have access to formal financial services and continuing good work on food security and human resource development.

Interviewer: Daniel, thank you for your time today.

Daniel Sloper: Not at all, thank you. Show less

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Our Ambassadors video series features short interviews with Australia's official representatives overseas. DFAT operates Australia's official missions abroad, each of which is run by an Ambassador, High Commissioner or Consul-General. The series will provide an insight into the work of our representatives abroad, and some of the major issues they are confronting as they pursue Australian interests in the countries where they are working.
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