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MDSeaGrant

Forecasting Sea Level Rise for Maryland

4,423 views 1 year ago
In 2013, scientists released new projections for future sea level rise for the Chesapeake Bay and for Maryland, Virginia and nearby Mid-Atlantic coastal areas. In these regions, sea levels are rising faster than the global average, the result of subsiding lands, a slowing Gulf Stream and melting land ice in Antarctica. Show less
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Fisheries and Watermen on the Chesapeake Bay Play

The Chesapeake Bay is more than a body of water, more than America's largest estuary. For those who live near its shores, the Bay provides a powerful sense of local identity. In the warm months, it is a home for workboats stacked with pots or equipped with coiled trotlines looking to catch blue crabs. In the colder months, the Bay even welcomes a few skipjacks whose crews still hoist their sails in pursuit of oysters as they have for generations. These videos give a glimpse at the lives of those who have made a living fishing the waters of the Chesapeake.

Scientists on the Chesapeake Bay Play

Support for sound scientific research and those who undertake it is at core of Maryland Sea Grant's mission. With a special focus on the Chesapeake Bay, Maryland Sea Grant has a tradition of fostering innovative scientific inquiry and analysis. We emphasize projects that offer practical applications for the protection and restoration of Maryland's coastal resources. This work promotes the sustainability of Maryland's environment and economy. These videos highlight research that has helped us to better understand and manage the Bay's resources.

Maryland Sea Grant Documentary trailers Play

Maryland Sea Grant documentaries bring marine science, policy, and other issues of concern to hundreds of thousands of people in the Chesapeake region. These award-winning films are made available on public television, cable and commercial stations, and for educational use by environmental organizations, citizen associations, and classroom teachers. They are also available for purchase through our online store. This playlist includes trailers for two of our recent documentaries and an update for one. To find about about other other documentaries, available on DVD, visit http://www.mdsg.umd.edu/store/videos/

Restoring the Watershed Play

In recent decades, the Chesapeake Bay ecosystem has deteriorated, and much of the decline is associated with human activities and population growth. Maryland Sea Grant promotes research and extension activities that can help restore the Chesapeake and its watershed. The videos in this playlist highlight restoration challenges and the efforts that individuals and groups are making to help clean up the ecosystem.

Culture and History Play

These videos highlight research on the diamondback terrapin, Maryland's state reptile, and the history of the University of Maryland, where the terrapin has held an important symbolic role at the school from the mid-1930s to the present.

Big Ships in the Chesapeake Play

Maryland Bay pilots climb aboard nearly every large, non-military ship bound into or out of Maryland waters. Standing in wheelhouses among mostly foreign crews, they guide deep-draft ships through a long, shallow estuary. Their skills are similar to a ship captain's: piloting, navigating and shiphandling for vessels of any size. But they bring to the boat something the incoming captains don't have: detailed local knowledge of all the Chesapeake Bay's trenches, shoals and dredged-out channels. How a pilot does his job, however, remains a mystery to most boaters on the Bay. Those of us who go oystering or crabbing or fishing or sailing seldom see a pilot. We may see a giant ship jutting up against the horizon and perhaps catch a glimpse of a solitary silhouette high up on the bridge wing, holding binoculars. How does he (or she) get a ship that big to Baltimore — without crashing into something or running aground somewhere like so many of us do? Written, directed and filmed by Michael W. Fincham.

Marine Education Play

Maryland Sea Grant works to increase marine science literacy across the full spectrum of education, from children in grade school to Ph.D. candidates. We are committed to helping inform and equip citizens to take on the long-term challenges of protecting the environmental and economic sustainability of Maryland's coastal resources. We want Marylanders to be able to continue to enjoy the Chesapeake Bay for generations to come. Environmental science has increasingly become a focus of science education in Maryland. Sea Grant's staff members in education have supported this trend by sharing the latest research results and methods in environmental science with school teachers and students. For more about our education programs, visit http://www.mdsg.umd.edu/our-education-programs

Aquaculture Play

Aquaculture is a valuable industry around the world. While it is not a major industry in Maryland, growing fish like striped bass in ponds or cages can be a profitable business. In these videos, Maryland Sea Grant Extension specialists provide detailed information about how to set up and run an aquaculture operation.
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