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Paralympic Games

Judo - London 2012 Paralympic Games

The only martial art on the Paralympic programme, the gripping, grappling sport of Judo offers plenty of action. Developed from jujitsu and established as a sport in the late 19th century by Dr Jigoro Kano, Judo requires athletes to employ an intricate mix of attack and defence. Contested at the Paralympic Games by visually impaired athletes, the sport's one-on-one battles can be tough, tense and explosive, as competitors grapple for command against determined opponents. There is very little variation between Paralympic Judo and its Olympic counterpart. The main difference is that in order to orientate themselves, players must have physical contact with their opponent before each contest begins. Reflecting its origins, all of the terminology of Judo is Japanese. Two athletes (judokas) gain points for throws, holds, armlocks and strangles in a bid to beat their opponent. A contest lasts for five minutes, with the athlete who has the highest score at the end of the contest the winner. The contest will stop immediately if one judoka achieves ippon -- the maximum score, two waza-ari (a lower score), or if the opponent either submits or is disqualified. The scores of waza-ari and yuko depend on how the opponent lands upon being thrown, and how long a judoka can immobilise their opponent on their back. (Note that the koka score has been dropped from Judo scoring since the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.) The referee gets the contest underway by shouting 'Hajime!'. In the event of a tie on points after five minutes, the contest enters a golden score period, when the first score wins. If neither scores during the period, a panel of two judges and referee decides the winner.
The only martial art on the Paralympic programme, the gripping, grappling sport of Judo offers plenty of action. Developed from jujitsu and established as a sport in the late 19th century by Dr Jigoro Kano, Judo requires athletes to employ an i...
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